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Rothschild Boulevard

Rothschild Boulevard in Tel Aviv is named after the famous Jewish philanthropist, Baron Edmond James de Rothschild who generously contributed to Israel in the early days of the country's establishment. Sderot Rothschild was established just over 100 years ago and runs from the Neve Tzedek neighborhood in the southwest to its northern point of Habima Square and theatre. The boulevard is famed for its up-market stores, trendy restaurants, and beauty. Rothschild Boulevard has a distinctly French feel with its wide central tree-lined pedestrian strip with bike lanes, benches, and public art. During the day the bustling boulevard is frequented by professionals from the adjacent financial district; locals enjoying brunch; people taking their dogs for a walk; pensioners relaxing under the trees or playing petanque and people browsing the books in the outdoor street library. At night Rothschild turns into a lively nightlife area with many top pubs, dining venues, and clubs.Rothschild Boulevard's Outstanding ArchitectureRothschild Boulevard is a great place to see some of Tel Aviv's renowned UNESCO-listed Bauhaus architecture. On the corner of Herzl Street and Rothschild Boulevard is a house built in 1909 by one of Tel Aviv's 60 founding families, the Eliavson family. At the corner of Allenby and Rothschild, you can see a large ceramic mural on the side of Lederberg House, built in 1925. The mural was designed by Ze'ev Raban, a member of the Bezalel art movement. The building was restored in 2007 when it was purchased by the French Institute. On the corner of Rothschild and Herzl Street, you can see a restored historic kiosk where you can buy a drink or snack. The Russian Embassy building, constructed in 1924 is one of the boulevard's architectural highlights.Points of Interest along Rothschild BoulevardPerhaps the top historic attraction along the boulevard is Independence Hall, the site of the signing of Israel's Declaration of Independence in 1948. Today it is a museum where you can learn about this historic event. In front of Independence Hall are a large fountain and an equestrian statue of Meir Dizengoff, the first mayor of Tel Aviv. You can visit the Hagana Museum at no.23 Rothschild to learn about Israel's defense force history. Rothschild Boulevard is part of Tel Aviv's art district and home to several important galleries including the Sommer Contemporary Art Gallery and the Alon Segev Gallery. The thing that attracts many locals to Rothschild is the tree-lined pedestrian area that runs down the middle of the Boulevard. Here you can often see groups of pensioners enjoying the sun, hipsters sipping their coffee, and young locals hanging out. Take a stroll down Rothschild Boulevard to soak up the atmosphere or if you'd like to really explore this charming area join a tour of Tel Aviv.Want to stroll the streets of Tel Aviv? join a Tel Aviv Private Tour and explore the city.

7 Best Cafés in Tel Aviv

If you’re a caffeine addict, and constantly in search of the perfect cup of coffee, you’re going to be in your element in Tel Aviv. The city is awash with fantastic coffee shops, nearly all of them independent, with lots of individual charm and atmosphere.The fact is that there’s a serious coffee culture in this city, ​​with many of the cafes roasting their own beans and selling bags of carefully- considered, customized blends to grateful locals. Most of them also serve great food, ranging from light bites to large plates that will keep you satisfied until dinner time.Yes, when it comes to cafes in Tel Aviv, you’re spoiled for choice…every neighborhood is awash with spots where you can grab a quick espresso, order a latte with almond milk, or just sit with a ‘Cafe Hafuch’ (the Israeli equivalent of the cappuccino) and savor that feeling you get when the caffeine kicks in.The Rothschild Coffee SpotHow much is a cup of coffee in Israel?We won’t sugarcoat it - Tel Aviv doesn’t fall in the ‘super cheap’ destinations list when it comes to accommodation, food and caffeinated beverages, and it’s certainly up there with the more costly cities of London, Paris and New York City.Having said that, once you’ve ordered your drink, you’re not going to be rushed and it’s quite common to see locals and tourists alike lingering over their cups for an hour or two while people-watching in the White City.In general, a cappuccino will cost you anywhere from 14-18 NIS ($4-5) depending on how fancy the place is - and if you’re sitting at a beachfront cafe, or want an iced coffee, it might be even a bit more costly. A tip for those on a budget - head to the chain Cofix, where a regular coffee to takeaway is half the price (in the summer, pick up an ice cafe and head to the beach for a truly heavenly experience).In the meantime, here’s what we reckon are nine of the best cafes in Tel Aviv. The only question is…which one should you begin with?1.CafeXohoCafe Xoho heads our list because it's truly one of the most beloved cafes in Tel Aviv, boasting a laid-back vice, a covered patio and home-cooked healthy (and usually vegetarian) food.Describing themselves as a ‘little cafe with big ideas’ the stars of the show include fluffy pancakes, homemade bagels and a mean breakfast burrito. And if coffee isn’t your thing, you can order a masala chai, a banana smoothie or even a mimosa! All food is made in-house and it’s a great place to sit with a book and while away the hours.With great staff, amazing food and a creative vibe, Cafe Xoho is a true rockstar!Address: Ben Yehuda St 73, Tel Aviv2. Tony and EstherSituated in the Shuk Levinsky, close to Tel Aviv’s hipster Florentin, Tony and Esther is a wonderful neighborhood cafe that serves not just great coffee but tasty vegan food and some very creative cocktails! Yes, this is a cafe in the morning, a restaurant at lunchtime and a restaurant/bar at night.With its spacious patio (and you don’t find many of these in Tel Aviv), there’s a very ‘local’ vibe at Tony and Esther, with music chosen both by employees and customers, and the lines get long as the sun goes down. The cheese blintzes, black lentil salad and schnitzel all come highly recommended and you can’t go wrong with any kind of coffee you order.Address: Levinski St 39, Tel Aviv3. OrigemClose to the beautiful Hilton Beach (arguably one of Tel Aviv’s loveliest stretches of white sand) on trendy Dizengoff Street you’ll find Origem, established by two Brazilians who came to live in Israel and wanted to offer quality coffee to the locals. Well, they’ve accomplished their mission.The coffee is roasted on-site (and you can also buy it in 250g bags) and the flavors change regularly, depending on the beans they’re using. They also serve small sandwiches, little cheese balls and chocolate Alfajores, which are magnificent. The baristas know what they’re doing and it shows.Get yourself to Origem - it’s small and cozy but you can also sit outside, at one of their few tables. You won’t be sorry.Address: Dizengoff St 203, Tel Aviv-Yafo4. Yom TovA stone’s throw from the city’s vibrant and lively Carmel Market (the perfect place to take a food tour of Tel Aviv) you’ll find Cafe Yom Tov, on the same named street. ‘Yom Tov’ in Hebrew means ‘Good day’ and that’s what you're going to have if you come here. It has a great vibe and indoor and outdoor seating and it's the perfect place to come for brunch.As well as the hot drinks (including fine coffee), people rave about their brisket sandwiches (served with pickles!), their acai bowl with fruit and date syrup and their legendary chocolate chip cookies. For those who want to work, there’s an area for those with laptops (not all cafes in Tel Aviv allow this!) Authentic to a tee, Cafe Yom Tov is a great place to kick back and afterward wander in the area’s pretty Yemenite Quarter.Address: Yom Tov St 30, Tel Aviv5. PuaThere’s no place like Jaffa - ancient, magical, evocative - and there’s no place like Puaa, a neighborhood cafe close to the famous flea market that’s a veritable institution. With its authentic vibes, and vintage style (including mismatched crockery and old sofas) it may well remind you of your grandmother’s house - in a good way - and its chilled atmosphere, makes it perfect for a lazy breakfast, lunchtime drinks, or a laid back dinner.Pua - One of the best places, located at the Jaffa Flea MarketPuaa’s quite eclectic in its offerings - think spinach and lentil dumplings, clementine and pomegranate juice, fried cauliflower with labneh - and the staff are friendly and welcoming, never making you feel like you’ve overstayed your welcome. Best of all, all the furniture is for sale, so you can buy that cup and saucer your coffee was served in!And for those who really fall in love with the area, you can always take a walking tour of Jaffa to learn more about its history and charm.Address: Rabbi Yohanan St 8, Tel Aviv6. The Little PrinceBook lovers, this one’s for you! Set just off the famous King George Street in downtown Tel Aviv, you’ll find The Little Prince, which is not just a lovely little cafe but a great bookstore, selling lots of printed matter not just in English but also Hebrew, French and German. Beloved by local students, it’s the perfect place to come, have a drink and a snack and get some work done.The Little Prince boasts extremely friendly staff, vintage furniture, decent wifi and light bites. As well as the inside (where you can surround yourself with the marvelous smell of printed matter) there’s a back garden (not everyone knows about it!) to sit in on warm days. Flaneurs and Bohemians will never want to leave, once they’ve discovered this little gem.Address:King George St 19, Tel Aviv7. Cafe NoirLast but not least on our list is Cafe Noir, a classy cafe/restaurant in the old historic part of Tel Aviv, close to trendy Rothschild Boulevard, where you’ll find so many gorgeous Bauhaus buildings. Intimate, elegant and charming, you could be forgiven for thinking you were in Paris or Vienna, with its ‘bistro style meets old-world charm’ feel.As well as coffee, beer and aperitifs, they have a good menu, which includes legendary dishes such as the chicken liver pate and veal schnitzel) and This is a great place for a date (when they turn the lights down and put on the jazz, it’s super romantic) or a spot to celebrate a special occasion. It’s also excellent for pre or post-theatre suppers since the Israeli theatre Ha Bima and the Israeli Opera House are close by.Finally, Tel Aviv is a paradise for coffee enthusiasts. The city's vibrant coffee culture, characterized by an abundance of independent cafes, each brimming with unique charm and atmosphere, makes it a must-visit destination for anyone in search of the perfect cup. Whether you are savoring a robust espresso, a frothy cappuccino, or a creative blend, the city's baristas take pride in their craft, often roasting their own beans and creating customized blends that cater to every palate. Despite the higher prices, the quality of the coffee and the inviting ambiance of these cafes make it worth every shekel. So, whether you're a local or a tourist, take your time to explore the diverse coffee spots Tel Aviv has to offer. From the laid-back vibe of Cafe Xoho to the bookish charm of The Little Prince, there’s a perfect spot for every coffee lover. Grab a cup, sit back, and enjoy the rich flavors and vibrant scenes of Tel Aviv’s coffee culture.
By Sarah Mann
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7 Best Italian Restaurants in Tel Aviv

If you’re visiting Tel Aviv and find yourself in the mood for some Italian cuisine, then you’re in luck. The Non-Stop City has a fantastic dining scene and the city is home to many top restaurants, many of which specialize in Italian fare, whether it’s simple pizza and pasta dishes or elegant Roman cuisine and Sicilian desserts that will make you sigh.Using high-quality ingredients, either grown locally (Israel’s famous for its cherry tomatoes!) or imported from the old country, even with minimal ingredients you’re talking about flavors and textures that never fail to hit the spot.From old-school trattorias to fine dining establishments, and from neighborhood haunts to celebrity haunts, here are what we think are seven of the best Italian restaurants in Tel Aviv…Neapolitan pizza, one of the most popular Italian dishes1. Cafe ItaliaIn the heart of Tel Aviv’s business district lies Cafe Italia, whose approach is ‘classic Italian food, served in a laid back atmosphere by professional yet warm staff’. And boy do they succeed in their mission! The dishes might be simple but they’re always well thought-out and presented and whilst the prices are high, you get good value and - hey - you only live once!From delightfully fresh salads to homemade tortellini, linguine and fettuccine (gluten-free options available) you’ll sigh with delight, and meat eaters will be in heaven with the Osso Bucco. For dessert, try the chocolate mousse or perhaps a classic Italian almond, lemon and polenta cake. And if you really want to indulge, take some of their gelato home…you won’t regret it. The wine list is also excellent by the way!Carbonara pasta. Italian traditional pasta2. ProntoPronto is a veritable institution in Tel Aviv and with good reason. One of the first trattorias in Tel Aviv, it’s headed by chef David Frankel, who has a reputation for creativity in his work…and the entire dining experience here perfectly combines formality. His desire to be innovative (reflected in the modern design) and yet traditional (using simple ingredients, that change with the season) is what makes this dining experience so wonderful.The menu is truly magnificent - buffalo mozzarella with aioli and anchovies and smoked pink trout with creme fraiche are excellent appetizers, not to mention dishes with figs, salty sheep's cheese and red snapper. Meat lovers will delight in the offal ravioli and sweetbreads with tartar, and seafood offerings include blue crabs with Jerusalem artichoke and red snapper with miso butter.With so much consideration taken in the composition of the dishes, truly this is Italian cuisine at its finest, which is why Pronto is consistently rated as one of Israel’s best restaurants).Arancini balls - Italian entree meal3. GemmaClose to the famous Gesher Theatre, in the trendy Noga area of south Tel Aviv, you’ll find this unassuming restaurant which serves tasty Italian fare with a slight Middle East twist, in warm and welcoming surroundings. Start with the artichoke and avocado salad or some crispy bruschetta, then pasta lovers should move on to lamb pappardelle or the gnocchi. The pizzas are particularly good - crispy, with just the right amount of cheese - and the tiramisu is divine.Gemma also has a lovely terrace on which to dine in warmer weather and inside you’ll find high ceilings and minimalist design, which make for a very comfortable dining experience! Afterward, if you’re not groaning from the large portions, take a stroll in nearby Jaffa, where you can enjoy the charm of the flea market and Artists’ Quarter as well as work off some calories!Lasagna Bolognese baked in the wood oven4. RusticoWith three branches across Tel Aviv, whether you dine at Rothschild Boulevard, Sarona or in the Old North you’re in for a treat at Rustico, which is beloved by locals for its intimate atmosphere and consistently good Italian dishes. The menu isn’t huge but everything on it is excellent - from the beef carpaccio and onion bruschetta to the spinach and lemon pappardelle and the mushroom risotto.The stars of the show, however, have to be their pizzas, which are a factor. Pizzas Tartufo (with truffles) and the Rustico (a Margherita with arugula added) are particularly good, and with a bottle of Chianti go down a treat. Plenty of sweet desserts to end your meal mean you’ll leave Rustico content and smiling.Asparagus and Mushroom Risotto with Thyme5. CantinaLocated on trendy and elegant Rothschild Boulevard, and is regularly frequented by the celebrities, artists and intellectuals of Tel Aviv. Cantina, this Italian eatery - with its huge balcony overlooking the people on the street, is the place to be, as well as enjoy authentic Italian food (just be aware that you absolutely have to book in advance!)Food is made with love from fresh ingredients, with all the dishes you’d expect including eggplant with mozzarella, beef carpaccio, pizzas, risottos and meat and fish grilled to perfection. They have an excellent wine list and are also open in the morning, so if you’re looking for breakfast in Tel Aviv then they can accommodate you. For dessert, it has to be the affogato!Afterward, take a stroll in this beautiful historic neighborhood and admire the Bauhaus architecture, or continue onto one of the areas's many trendy cocktail bars.Mushroom-stuffed ravioli pasta with creamy parmesan cheese sauce6. PankinaOn the corner of trendy Dizengoff Street with Gordon, you’ll find Pankina, an Italian restaurant and wine bar that has been delighting diners since it opened in 2017. As well as serving up excellent food, it has two other special attributes - it’s kosher (so perfect for orthodox Jews) and it also caters to those who are gluten-intolerant.Dishes that diners rave about include the Concia di Zucchine (a staple of Roman-Jewish, made up of courgettes marinated with olive oil, mint., garlic and parsley) four cheese gnocchi, arancini (fried risotto balls) and seared salmon. The desserts are all excellent, but the standout choice has to be their creamy, fluffy semifreddo. Cozy and charming, you'll want to return once you’ve eaten dinner on their terrace.Pasta alla Norma with eggplant, tomato, parmesan and basil7. Amore MioLast but not least, we had to include Amore Mio, a local restaurant on our list, because of its fantastic ambiance, great food and reasonable prices. Located on Ibn Givrol, close to Rabin Square, it's a trattoria that’s really stood the test of time and with its large portions and casual is very family-friendly (though not a bad place for a date either!)Whether you’re looking for a salad (their ‘Amore’ with lettuce, arugula, croutons, roasted red bell peppers, walnuts and Parmesan is fabulous) antipasti (the eggplant with tomato sauce comes highly recommended) or an enormous plate of pasta (adventurous eaters will enjoy the ‘Zio Giovanni’ which comes with goose breast) you won’t be disappointed. The pizzas are - without exception - all wonderful and the Millefoglia and chocolate fondant will both leave you speechless.Order a Peach Bellini, a Negroni or a simple glass of house red and enjoy! Amore Mio - what’s not to love?Tel Aviv offers a wide variety of culinary experiences beyond single-cuisine restaurants. In addition to dining at these restaurants, we recommend joining food tours in Tel Aviv to not only taste but also learn about the diverse range of dishes.
By Sarah Mann
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8 Best Nightclubs in Tel Aviv

Tel Aviv’s not known as the ‘City that Never Sleeps’ for nothing! Along with its stunning beaches, fashionable restaurants, beautiful Bauhaus architecture and pretty people, this is a city that comes to life when the sun goes down and for party lovers and thrill lovers, the city is packed full of nightclubs, all with their own style and charm.Whether you’re looking for a chilled outdoor scene, clubs that give dance lessons before the party starts, or ‘underground vibes’ with hard-core techno you’ll find it in the Non-Stop City - Tel Aviv has bars and clubs to suit every taste and budget. So prepare yourselves, and rest before you hit the town, because chances are you might not return to your bed before the sun comes up…1. Kuli AlmaNestled in South Tel Aviv, and a bit of a neighborhood institution, you’ll find Kuli Alma (‘The Whole World’ in Aramaic, the language spoken in Israel in ancient times). Owned and operated by a number of DJs, artists and party people, it’s a cool underground bar that’s consistently voted one of Tel Aviv’s best night clubs and if you visit you’ll know why.Kuli Alma has a number of rooms, all playing different music…and the fact that it’s split into levels means it’s a club, bar, art space and entertainment hub all rolled into one. Cool, hip and artsy, if you want to experience Tel Aviv like the locals do, this is where to head. The music tends to be electric (and gets more extreme as the night goes on). Arrive before 11 pm if you don’t want to join a line and expect it to be packed on the weekends. Unmissable. 2. Jimmy WhoThis lounge bar on Rothschild Boulevard is a tried-and-tested favorite on the Tel Aviv club scene, and an ideal spot for clubbers who like electronic music (save for Mondays, when the beats are more techno and house) Split into three different spaces.Jimmy Who offers clubbers a large dance space, a designated smoking area and a buzzy atmosphere. Good drinks, although a little pricey, and themed evenings make for plenty of fun. Prepare to party in the early morning!3. ShalvataIf you want to party next to the Mediterranean coastline, under open skies and aren’t too worried about the price tag, then Shalvata is the spot for you. This lounge bar, in the heart of the Tel Aviv Namal Port area, is popular both with locals and tourists, and because it's set up as both open plan and open air, it’s an amazing place to drink a beer in the afternoon then just dance all evening and into the small hours.Shalvata’s music is quite mainstream, but the atmosphere is great - expensive sound system, modern lighting, live shows - and the vibes chilled. The whole ‘indoor-outdoor’ concept is quite unique by Tel Aviv nightclub standards, and at the weekends - with the DJd in overdrive - expect it to be crowded.4. SputnikDown a small alleyway, off Allenby Street, down in historic Tel Aviv, you’ll find Sputnik, a club that opened in 2016 and in no time at all gained cult status. Describing itself as a ‘multi-retro futuristic bar’ it has wildly cool decor (think mannequins, street signs and odd paintings) and is known for its specialty cocktails and light bites.For those that want to dance, head inside to the large dance floor where. techno music rules the scene but different DJS work each night. With an underground feel to it, Sputnik tends to host a young, hipster crowd but the atmosphere is so welcoming and staff so friendly that, no matter your age, you're bound to have fun.Credit: Sputnik Insagram5. HavanaIf you’re a fan of Latin music and dance, you can’t miss the Havana club down in Tel Aviv’s business district. With three different rooms where you can take lessons at the beginning of the evening, as the night progresses the place fills up. The largest space has an enormous parquet floor which is perfect for those wanting to discover their inner dancer or just strut their stuff and it’s a great place both to brush up on basic steps or simply perfect your moves.Salsa and bachata songs are very popular here and the expensive sound system and great cocktails just add to the magic. The reasonably priced food menu and outdoor seating areas are both bonuses! Be prepared for Havan to be busy on the weekends but if you’re a night owl then you’re in luck because it’s often open until 5 am.6. DuplexWith multiple dance floors and a rooftop space as well, Duplex is known for its diverse music scene, including 90’s rock, hip hop, reggae and themed events. Located in hipster Florentin, the biggest bonus for many is that there’s no smoking allowed inside the club (nicotine addicts can head to the balconies). With DJs who know their stuff and a relaxed crowd, you get several experiences for the price of one ticket!Credit:Duplex Insagram7. Zoo ZooLocated on beautiful and elegant Rothschild Boulevard, you can’t miss Zoo Zoo’s entrance because there are flamingos outside it! Whilst it markets itself as a gastropub, there’s a fun dance floor inside and the music (Latin, reggaeton, hip hop) attracts a great crowd, particularly at the weekends when it’s packed to the gills.Zoo Zoo has outdoor seating, cozy corners and a small but tasty menu - the music pulses, the people are young and beautiful and you can see it’s a spot where Tel Avivis love coming to kick back after a long work week. With every night a new experience, no wonder it's always so busy.8. Lima LimaWith a reputation for epic partying, Lima Lima’s got to be on the list for anyone visiting Tel Aviv. This is a spot that has a reputation for serious partying, with different themes each night (Thursdays are old school hip-hop, Friday's mainstream and each Monday it hosts a gay-friendly evening).With a large dance floor (always packed) and a great seating area outside, it’s well designed and with a great sound system and DJs who know what they’re doing (plus take requests), you can’t not enjoy yourself. They also have deals for ‘all-you-can-drink bracelets’ until certain hours, so head on down to Nahalat Binyamin where you can dance for hours or just sit outside and chill.
By Sarah Mann
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The 8 Best Cocktail Bars in Tel Aviv

Looking for a fun night out in Tel Aviv with drinks that will make your eyes widen and taste buds tingle? Well, you’re in luck, because the Non-Stop City, known for its pulsating nightlife, is home to any number of excellent cocktail bars, all offering visitors a mixology experience that won’t be forgotten in a hurry.From swish and opulent spaces to 1920’s ‘Speakeasy’ style bars and local ‘down-and-dirty’ drinking dens, you’ll be blown away by the edgy vibes and the flair and creativity of the creations being served up. Here are what we think are some of the best cocktail bars in Tel Aviv…just remember to pace yourself!1. SpicehausThis ‘cocktail lab’ of a bar, on trendy Dizengoff Street, is a must-visit - not just because of the serious mixology going on but for the ‘themed’ element of it all. Staff where white chemists' coats and drinks are often served in lab equipment such as flasks and beakers. Add to the atmosphere the wild decor touches (bras hanging in the windows) and the Edgar Allen Poe poem recording in the bathroom and how could you not be enticed?Spicehaus has ‘sharing cocktails’ (ideal for couples or gangs of friends) and as well as the classics, there are plenty of unusual creations (the ‘Istanbul’) and the bar team are always up for requests. The food they offer really hit the spot - the ‘crack toast’ comes highly recommended and up until 08:30 pm, the happy hour means you’ll get a great deal. Forget your dull days in chemistry class - this science lab is fun!2. BellBoyAt this achingly hip bar, the general premise revolves around the idea that life is something that needs to be enjoyed. So if you’re looking for fun, head to the Berdichevsky Hotel, because fun you will have. Inside, you’ll find BellBoy, where everything at this 1920’s inspired bar is both beautiful and, as the owners remark, ‘out of the ordinary’.Extraordinary cocktail servings - BellBoy (Credit:BellBoy Instagram)Inspiringly-named cocktails include the ‘Tooth Fairy’ (mate-infused pisco, syrup, mint and soda), ‘Holy Water’ (mastika, eucalyptus, lime, Sauvignon Blanc and Myrrh) or ‘Monkey Business (dark rum, sour rum, Vermouth and Benedictine) are all gorgeously presented. As for bar snacks? Order the duck pate, which is actually molded into the shape of a rubber duck. Truly a unique night out…3. ImperialUnder the watchful eye of some veteran cocktail bar staff at this upscale hotel, the Imperial’s aim (as it boasts) is to create a ‘temple to the lost art of the cocktail.’ And this they do - which is why they’ve won award after award for their creations, all served up in upscale, elegant surroundings, with dim lighting and old-world ambiance, swing jazz playing quietly in the background.Credit: Imperial Cocktail Bar Instagram The drinks at the Imperial are nothing short of fabulous. Try an ‘East of Eden’ (Bombay Sapphire gin, Fino sherry, fresh apple juice and bay leaf-white pepper cordial), or ‘Silver Buddha Punch’ (Banana and pineapple-infused Agricole rums, Amaro Montenegro and silver needles tea cordial). Daring drinkers should sip at the famous ‘Prelude to a Kiss’ (Pere Magloire apple brandy, pisco capel, fresh lime and peach jam) and if you’re not in the mood for alcohol, order their ‘Dollar Shake’ (a show-stopping strawberry milkshake creation).4. Bar 223Up in the Old North, on a quieter part of trendy Dizengoff Street, close to the Namal Port and Park Hayarkon, you’ll find 223, a fine establishment, without pretensions, which has been serving up mouthwatering creations since 2008. The bar staff are knowledgeable and expert at their craft, and with a chilled mood and high-quality drinks, you’re assured of a good time.From classics like the Negroni and Old Fashioned to bespoke creations (the bar staff all speak English so don’t be afraid to ask lots of questions) you can’t go wrong. Teamed with their hamburgers and pizza, you’ll never want to leave. Prices are high but luckily they have a happy hour, so get there early and enjoy.The yard is waiting for you at Dizengoff 223 (Credit:223 Bar Tel Aviv Instagram)5. The Library BarCocktail bars in Tel Aviv don’t come much more stylish than the Library Bar at the elegant and luxurious Norman Hotel. Elegant creations, served in this uber-chic space (the decor is 1940’s British colonial style) and, open all day, this means you can begin enjoying cocktails at lunchtime (and in bar this good, you may stay until closing time). With an extensive list of spirits, and an expert team, as night falls the lights are dimmed and the atmosphere is transformed, making the Library Bar a glamorous choice not just for martinis and daiquiris but also some excellent complimentary bar snacks. To say this place is stylish is an understatement - the Library Bar is probably Tel Aviv’s most coveted spot for an evening drink so reserve well in advance!6. MargozaSet in beautiful and historic Old Jaffa, in the heart of the famous Flea Market, lies Margoza, a friendly neighborhood bar where, just like Cheers, everyone knows your name. A gastrofood haven, with a variety of tapas snacks, their cocktails mixed by expert bartenders who are always friendly and ever-obliging, will go down a treat.Margoza has seating both inside and out (perfect for spring and summer evenings) and great cocktails at very affordable prices. The food they serve up is also very good - try the lamb hummus or ‘flea market platter’ with your drink. Margoza is really a place that makes you feel you’ve come home, and with one of their mean Moscow Mules in your hand, just sit back and enjoy the Jaffa vibe.Credit: Margoza Bar Instagram7. FantasticWith its extraordinary design (inspired, as the owners remark, by ‘fairy tales, poetry, literature and wild animals’) there can’t be a bar in Tel Aviv that’s had so much time, money and effort put into it - and it shows. Up in the Namal Port area, Fantastic (owned by the BellBoy group) is a cross between 1920’s glamour and ‘Alice in Wonderland’ and the moment you enter their ‘Ball Room’ cocktail bar you’ll feel the magic immediately.Credit: Fantastic Bar InstagramFantastic serves up well-mixed cocktails, all in their own special cups and glasses (designed specially) with plenty of little gimmicks beside (go and see for yourself if you’re curious). Accompanying food plates are delicious - try the goose breast or the scallop bisque. Oh, and the decor and drinks at this place are incredibly photogenic so Instagram lovers will be in their element. Costly but a great night out and perfect for a special occasion.8. Social ClubLast but not least, don’t forget Social Club, just off beautiful Rothschild Boulevard, a New York-style bistro which is perfect for an early-evening drink, before the restaurant gets crowded. This ‘happening’ spot in Tel Aviv is always lively and whilst it might look chaotic (staff aren’t assigned to particular tables), there’s a method to the madness and a vibrancy to the place which you can’t miss.As well as the classics (their gin-based cocktails are particularly recommended) the bartenders will be happy to listen to your suggestions and the food bar, in the centre of the restaurant, is very well-designed. If you want to eat with your cocktail, the tataki tuna, grilled aubergine and beef bresaola. Social Club also has a space upstairs for private events, if you’re looking to throw a birthday bash or family event. Pricey but, hey, you only live once.
By Sarah Mann
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Beyond Dizengoff Square: 5 Beautiful Squares in Tel Aviv

Why do people - both locals and tourists - enjoy spending time at city squares? Well, there are many reasons, and not just because they’re often very beautiful. Public squares have all kinds of benefits - historically they were used as marketplaces, bringing people together democratically.Today, they still host gatherings, such as the huge2023 protests but they’re also places where people socialize, sit in cafesfor an Israeli breakfast, enjoy musical performances and sometimes even live theatre.Squares can also be very beautiful, with ponds and fountains adding to the appeal. They offer fantastic ecological benefits with trees and plants that give out oxygen and also provide shade and shelter. Often they’re named after famous writers, politicians or great historical figures, which adds to the cultural element.Just like London, New York, and Paris, Israel's liveliest city has its own architectural squares (‘kikarim’), which are bound to delight travelers. Here’s our guide to five Tel Aviv Squares that you really must see, when you’re visiting this young and dynamic city:1. Habima SquareThe Habima Square is new, modern, and attractive - a wide open space, that is popular as a meeting place and a hang-out for friends. Habima Square gardenDeliberately minimalist in design, it has a sunken garden, water basins, and flower beds which come to life in the spring. There’s a lot of local flora in this square too - cacti, almond and sycamore trees, and gorgeous-smelling lavender bushesWhat’s going on in the area?The Habima square and surrounding area are filled with Tel-Avivi cultural treasures - there’s the Habima theatre itself (recently redesigned, with glass windows which give you a fantastic view inside at night) and the Mann auditorium, where the Israeli Philharmonic regularly performs and a short walk away is the Israeli Opera House.Habima Theater at night (Image source: Oren Rozen CC BY-SA 3.0)This square also sits at the top of beautiful Rothschild Boulevard, one of Tel Aviv’s most famous and lovely streets - perfect for strolling, admiring Bauhaus architecture or simply sitting in a sidewalk cafe and people-watching. The area has some of Tel Aviv'stop 10 restaurants and cool pubstoo, so it’s the perfect place to go for drinks and dinner.2. Dizengoff SquarePerhaps the most iconic square in Tel Aviv, Dizengoff Square (‘Kikar Dizengoff’) was always popular with locals and tourists but since its major revamp, it’s even more of a ‘go to’ spot. Dizengoff Square (Image source: Ovedc CC BY-SA 4.0)In the heart of the city’s beloved Dizengoff Street, on the square, sits the famous ‘Fire and Water’ fountain designed by Yaakov Agam, and all around are trees (great for summer shade) and chairs (for free) where you can sit and admire the view.What’s going on in the area?Everything you can possibly imagine! Dizengoff Street is home to endless cafes and bars, and if you’re looking for a Tel Aviv fashion shopping experience, with its clothing boutiques, jewelry studios, Bauhaus center, and iconic shopping mall, this is the street for you.The square area is great for shoppingDirectly on the square, you’ll see the Cinema Hotel, a wonderfully-restored Bauhaus building which today is a boutique hotel but once was a popular cinema (walk inside and see a projector from the 1950s on show!) It’s also not too far from the famousCarmel Market, which is a must-visit for foodies.And if you don’t have dinner plans, try one of many eateries near to the square - from La Shuk restaurant for upscale Mediterranean fare to amazing falafel at street food hangout ‘Ha Kosem’ you can’t go wrong.3. Rabin SquareRabin Square is also famous within Tel Aviv - not just as a square where protests and celebrations regularly take place but also as the place where Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin was assassinated in November 1995.The main sculpture in the canter of Rabin Square (Image source: Lishay Shechter) Formerly known as The Square of the Kings of Israel, its name was changed afterward to commemorate this tragic event. On the other hand, if you want to see a true Israeli celebration, head for Rabin Square every time a local soccer or basketball group wins the city championship, or when an Israeli athlete wins an Olympic medal - this is the place Tel-Avivians go to celebrate.What’s going on in the area?This is not a particularly tourist area, but a good place to really ‘feel’ what the city is like. In one corner of the square, look for the sculpture of Rabin, close to the spot where he was shot three times (you’ll see memorial candles flickering, lit by passers-by, commemorating his life). There’s also a pretty lily pond where you can sit and look out at the people on the street.The Rabin Square memorial corner (Image source: Christian Engeln)Fifteen minutes south by foot, you’ll find the Cinematheque (if you’re a lover of independent movies) and fifteen minutes west will find youGordon Beach, which is perfect for sunbathing, cycling, and strolling on the boardwalk. Mass protest in Rabin Square (Image source: Itayba)There are plenty of restaurants and cafes on the main street - and those who yearn for a Tel Aviv shopping spree can visit the nearby Gan Ha’ir center, full of chic boutiques.4. Kikar KedumimIn English, Kikar Kedumim means ‘The Square of Ancient Times’ and it’s aptly named because this spot is in the heart of Jaffa, an ancient and magical port city that dates back to Biblical times and is a must-visit spot for anyone visiting Israel (especially those who like their Instagram and want to capture the perfect shot).Kdumim Square The central landmark on this square is St. Peter’s Church, built by the Spanish in 1888 for the Franciscan brotherhood - and prepared to be bowled over by its ‘Cathedral-style’ interior.What’s going on in the area?Jaffa is truly magical and almost impossible to visit and not fall in love. Within easy walking distance of Kikar Kedumim, you have the famous Jaffa Flea Market (‘Shuk ha Pishpeshim) which is the perfect place to hunt for second-hand, retro, and vintage items, and pick up souvenirs from Israel, before enjoying a coffee and bite to eat in one of the numerous local cafes and bars that surround it.The Kdumin Square area (Image source: Gady Munz Pikiwiki Israel CC BY 2.5)Jaffa’s also home to a beautiful Artist’s Quarter (with tiny, winding streets) where you can wander for hours, popping into galleries and studios, and also a fine harbor, perfect for strolling. In nearby Abrasha Park, don’t forget to stop at the Wishing Bridge and then take a look at the famous stone statue ‘The Gates of Faith’. And if you really want to understand the history and culture of the area, consider taking an Old Jaffa walking tour, where a local guide can fill you in on the legends and lore of this extraordinary place.5. Atarim SquareDesigned by the architect Yaaokv Rechter, Atarim Square sits at the end of Ben Gurion Boulevard, close to Gordon Beach. Constantly dividing opinion in terms of its aesthetics, it was built in the 1970s in a brutalist style (then considered very fashionable in architectural circles) and boasted - amongst other things - restaurants, stores, and a glass rotunda.The Atarim Square area (Image source:Michael Yakovson)Today, it’s far less fashionable but Kikar Atarim still offers outstanding views of the Mediterranean. Although it’s more empty, for anyone interested in design, it’s well worth a visit. In any event, the municipality is considering development plans in which case, try to see it before it’s gone! There’s also the Ben Gurion House nearby, which is a wonderful chance to see the home of Israel’s first Prime Minister (and it’s been kept just as he used it, back in the 1950s).What’s going on in the area?One of the things Tel Aviv is most famous for is its beaches - white sand, clear blue water, a fabulous promenade and cafes and restaurants not just along it but on the sand too. Walk south and you’ll hit Gordon and Frishman beaches - always popular, and full of people playing volleyball, and matkot (using two small paddles and a ball, it’s Israel’s most beloved sport).The Beach and Marina are just around the cornerWalk north along the beach and you’ll arrive at Hof Hilton, which is the city’s non-official ‘gay beach’ and also frequented by surfers on winter days when the waves are big. Keep walking and you’ll come to the Namal - the Tel Aviv Port - which is filled with restaurants, cafes, and stores as well as an indoor gourmet food marketand, on Fridays until 2pm, a delightful farmer’s market.Relax, drink something interesting, and enjoy yourself!If you’re visiting Israel and want to make the most of your time in the country, we also offer a wide range of day trips, which can take you to Jerusalem from Tel Avivand head south to discover Masada Fortress or take a day on the shore of the Dead Sea. If you'd like to see some marvelous green sceneries, consider taking a tour of northern Israel, and if you're feeling adventurous, we can even take you to visit the Lost City of Petra.Feel free to contact us by email or phone for more information and if you’re curious about Israel, take a look at our our blog which takes a deep dive into all things related to our country.
By Sarah Mann
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Culture in Tel Aviv: Art, Cinema, and Theater

Tel Aviv is much more than justwhite sandy beachesand some of thebest clubs in Israel- it’s a vibrant, modern city that’s always changing, re-inventing itself - and that goes for its cultural scene too.Whether you choose to explore it independently or decide to take a guided Tel Aviv tour, you should remember that Tel Aviv's art museumsare world-class, and the city's full of art galleries, Israeli theaters, and cinemas that could keep you busy for days on end. From history and photography to design and performance, it’s up to you. So where should Tel Aviv culture lovers begin?Tel Aviv Museum of ArtWe have to start with the Tel Aviv Art Museum - it’s a must-visit for any culture vulture, since it’s home to a huge collection of both classical and contemporary art, showcasing works both by Israeli and international artists.From Chagall and Van Gogh to famous Israeli artists such as Kadishman and Gutman, lose yourself in beauty, and after you’ve finished, take a walk in their sculpture garden outside.The Tel Aviv Museum of ArtOnce you’ve filled your head with all this beauty, step outside and stroll down Rothschild Boulevard, home to some stunning renovated Bauhaus structures as well as some lovely cafes perfect for an Israeli breakfastand several dining spots that are among the best restaurants in Tel Aviv.This is Tel Aviv culture at its very best.Center for Contemporary ArtFounded 25 years ago, the Center for Contemporary Art has grown from one small room to a dynamic hub that includes two exhibition spaces and an auditorium at Tel Aviv’s Pollack Gallery and it’s one of Israel’s leading centers for experimental art.Do you like Modern Art? TheCenter for Contemporary Art will be right up your alley!Operating as a non-profit, its mission is to provide visitors with a window into unusual and avant-garde ideas. It hosts several large exhibitions each year, as well as guest lectures, screenings, and panels.Both local and international artists have showcased their work here and with all printed matter in Hebrew, English, and Arabic, you can see that the CCA takes the fostering of a cooperative spirit seriously.Nahum Gutman Museum of ArtDedicated to the artist Nahum Guttman who lived here, this small museum is located in the charming and picturesque neighborhood of Neve Tzedek. Gutman was born in Moldova but in 1905 his family moved to Ottoman Palestine.One of the creations displayed at the Nahum Gutman Museum of Art (Image source: Itzuvit CC BY-SA 3.0)The Nahum Gutman Museum documents his memories of Tel Aviv and Jaffa, providing a fascinating glimpse into the lives of both Jewsand Arabs living in the area at that time. Gutman pioneered a new and distinct ‘Israeli’ style, moving away from European influences and working in several mediums, including, oils, pen and ink, and mosaics.The museum also hosts temporary exhibitions (sculpture, watercolor, ceramics, photography) and it’s a wonderful place to pop into if you’re wandering the area.Rubin MuseumBorn in Romania, to a poor religious Jewish family, Reuben Ruben moved to Paris to study before emigrating to British Mandate Palestinein the early 1920s. He subsequently became a famous painter, drawing on Biblical themes and landscapes of the Holy Land in what today is known as the ‘Eretz Israel’ (‘Land of Israel’) style.One of Rubin's wonderful creations (Image source; The official Rubin Museum website)Today, you can visit his home for yourself - the Rubin Museum is on lovely Bialik Street, a stone’s throw from the Carmel Market. There, you’ll see many of his paintings, including early Tel Aviv vistas, Galilee landscapes, and landscapes and views of Jerusalem.You can really get a sense of the man, since the studio has been preserved, and if you come with kids, take them down to the basement where there’s a children’s workshop.Design Museum HolonJust twenty minutes outside Tel Aviv you’ll find Holon, a typical Israeli city that most tourists will never consider visiting. However, the fact that it’s home to the Design Museummeans that since 2016, when it opened, quite a few tourists have been making the journey there and what they find does not disappoint.The building itself is an artwork. The Design Museum on HolonActually, you could visit here just for the design of the building itself - this Ron Arad creation can be seen from a distance, with its sinuous steel ribbons in burnt orange providing the perfect Israeli Instagram opportunity.Inside, there are all kinds of exhibitions that change regularly, all devoted to contemporary design around the world, including students in design schoolsaround Israel.Habima TheaterHabima sits at the top of the beautiful Rothschild Boulevard and is considered to be a world-class theater. It first opened in 1945, before the establishment of the State of Israel, but as time passed it was rebuilt and today it showcases all kinds of plays.Whilst the theater companies usually perform in Hebrew, there are often simultaneous translations in English, so visitors don’t miss out!Enjoy local and international art!Habima (which actually means ‘The Stage’ in Hebrew) puts on plays and musicals produced both in Israel and across the world, many to critical acclaim.So whether you want to see an Israeli classic, a modern play from Europe or even a musical (both Mamma Mia and Les Mis have come here) you’re assured of a great night out. New Israeli OperaOpera buffs, this one’s for you! Founded in 1995, The New Israeli Opera has made a name for itself in Tel Aviv for its imaginative productions, ranging from classics like Mozart’s Don Giovanni and Puccini’s Tosca to original Israeli pieces such as Hanoch Levin’s ‘Opera’ and ‘Theodor’ - written by Yonatan Cnaanan, it’s subject is Theodor Herzl, widely regarded as the inspiration for the modern Israeli state.The Tel Aviv OperaProductions are sung in the original language (both Hebrew and English subtitles are provided) and with ravishing costumes, marvelously designed sets, and some very grandiose performances, you’re in for an unforgettable evening.Not too far fro there you'll find is the Sarona Complex, where you can grab a bite to eat, drink, or just wander around the beautifully renovated houses that were once home to the German Templars.Cameri TheaterThe Cameri, founded in 1944, is one of Israel’s leading theatres and, to date, has staged over 600 productions, in front of thousands of people. Based in central Tel Aviv, next to the Opera House, they put on around 15 new plays every year.Discover Israeli theaterRenowned for their directors and casts (several of whom were actually awarded the Israel Prize for contributions to their field) usually plays In are performed in Hebrew but there are occasional English-language productions. ‘The Wandering Israeli’ for example, has been a smash hit at the Cameri, hailed for its excellent cast, great music, comedy, and storytelling.It’s the perfect introduction for anyone visiting Israel for the first time and curious to know more about its people.Beit Lessin TheaterFounded in 1980 by director Yaakov Agmon, Beit Lessin Theatre produces and puts on a very diverse and high-quality repertoire of Israeli and international productions, performing seven days a week on three different stages.A show at the Beit Lessin Theater (Image source: Gadi Dagon CC BY-SA 3.0)Always emphasizing local talent and contemporary plays, the company premieres 10-12 new productions each season, of which around a third are world premieres.Beit Lessin has gained a reputation for putting on plays that really get talked about - whether they’ve just been written or are adaptations or modern classics and old-but-gold favorites. And the playwright Shmuel Hasfari’s trilogy (‘Kiddush’ ‘Chametz’ and ‘Shiva)’ in the mid1990s) really helped put them on the map.Tel Aviv CinemathequeIf you love independent movies, then head to Cinematheque, which is one of Tel Aviv’s best centers for small-budget productions, foreign films, and regular international film festivals. Opened In 1973, as a venue for fringe end arthouse films, its aim was certainly to provoke conversations about social and political issues of the day.The Tel Aviv Cinematheque (Image source: Vysotsky CC BY-SA 4.0)Today, it’s still doing that (with six screaming halls, all with state-of-the-art projection facilities) but if independent films aren’t your thing then don’t fear, because they still have plenty of evenings where blockbusters, cult classics, and smash-hit documentaries are put on.Rav Chen DizengoffBeloved by native English speakers (since all of its movies are in English, with Hebrew subtitles), Rav Chen sits in the heart of Tel Aviv, just opposite the famous Dizengoff Square. Part of a chain that operates across Israel, it boasts super comfortable chairs, six screens and plenty of concessions stands for popcorn lovers.Open seven days a week, and showing premieres and blockbusters, it's the perfect place to pass a rainy day in winter or a scorching hot afternoon in the Israeli summer…and because it's in the heart of Tel Aviv, there are plenty of cafes and restaurants around so, afterwards, you can people-watch, eat dinner or simply grab some Israeli street food.Lev DizengoffEstablished 27 years ago, and now with seven of its kind across Israel, Lev Dizengoff has gained a reputation for screening quality international films that are distinctly non-mainstream, but good enough to win international film awards.Tucked away on the third floor of the Dizengoff Center, the theatres are cozy but comfortable - it’s the antithesis of an IMAX experience!Dizengoff CenterFilms made by veteran directors such as Ang Lee (‘The Wedding Banquet’ and ‘Brokeback Mountain’) Pedro Almodovar (‘All About my Mother’ and ‘Talk to Her’) and Mike Leigh (‘Secrets and Lies ’and ‘Vera Drake’) are typical fare and a trip to the Lev (with its intimate feel) can often provoke nostalgia amongst Tel Avivis!If you’re traveling to Israel and want to make the most of your time, consider discovering the true charm of this country with our professionally guided tours. Besides Tel Aviv tours for every taste, we offer tours in holy Jerusalem, day trips to theDead Sea, Masada fortress, Ein Gedi, the crusader city ofAkko, Cesarea, the stunningGolan heights,and many more.Feel free to contact us by email or phone for more information and if you’re curious about Israel, read more about life here on our blog.
By Sarah Mann
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Tel Aviv Sightseeing on foot: Where Should You Start?

There’s nothing like walking the streets of a city to really get a feel for it - the people, the architecture, the green spaces, the culture, and the food scene. And if you’re visiting Israel, and looking for an urban experience where you can skip buses, taxis, and even bikes in favor of your feet, look no further than Tel Aviv.The magical alleys of JaffaThis lively, modern city ticks all the boxes for walking - it’s flat (unlike hilly Jerusalem), it’s pretty compact (you can walk from Park Hayarkonin the north to theOld Jaffa portin under two hours) and it’s full of fantastic neighborhoods, each with their distinct vibe and charm. Here are our three suggested itineraries for you - basic, intermediate, and complete.1.Tel Aviv Sightseeing on Foot:Basic RouteStart at the Beit Ha’ir - the Museum of the History of Tel Aviv. It’s a great way to learn about how the city, from its humble beginnings in 1910 to the modern metropolis it’s become. It’s a beautiful building on Bialik Street- close to the Carmel Market, considered one of thebest markets in Tel Aviv - that’s been recently renovated and today is a real cultural hub, with plenty of good exhibitions to see.One of Carmel Market's vegetable standsStep outside and across the street to Bialik House - home to one of Israel’s greatest poets, Haim Nahman Bialik, who lived there (you can see many of his books inside). A pioneer of poetry in both the Hebrew and Yiddish languages, the house was designed in the Bauhaus style and has a lovely interior.Bialik Square in Tel AvivA moment’s walk away, still on Bialik Street, stop at the Rubin Museum. Born in Romania to a poor orthodox Jewishfamily, Ruben studied in Paris before emigrating to British Mandate Palestine in 1923 and subsequently became an accomplished painter, drawing on biblical themes and Holy Land landscapes.The studio where he painted has been preserved and is fascinating to look at and the museum periodically puts on special workshops for children.One of Rubin's wonderful creations (Image source: the official Rubin Museum website)By now, you’re probably ready for lunch, so head over to Nahalat Binyamin - every Tuesday and Friday it hosts a wonderful Arts and Crafts fair where everything sold is made by hand by local artists. Stop for a bite and a coffee at one of the many cafesand restaurants that line its streets.Then, join a Tel Aviv graffiti tourto see for yourself the raw talent of Israel;’s young artists, on the walls of surrounding buildings.2. Tel Aviv Sightseeing on Foot:Intermediate RouteFollow all of the above steps, until you get to lunch - But instead of Nahalat Binyamin, head over to the Yemenite Quarter for lunch - it’s a charming neighborhood, full of tiny streets, small houses, and plenty of great eateries including Cafe Yom Tov and Shlomo and Doron’s hummus restaurant.Nakhlat Binyamin street artAfterwards, head south for about 15-20 minutes and you’ll soon reach Neve Tzedek. It’s one of the city’s most popular areas for tourists and when you wander around you’ll see why - renovated buildings, gorgeous tree-lined back streets, and lots of upmarket boutiques, jewelry stores, and cafes on the main drag, Shazabi Street.Treat yourself to some gelato at Anita, wander past the Suzanne Dellal Modern Dance Center, and then end your walking day by heading over to Rothschild Boulevard. One of the city’s most fashionable and exclusive streets, it’s the perfect place to stroll, enjoy Bauhaus architecture or simply sit with a coffee and engage in some people watching.Suzanne Dallal Center in Tel AvivAnd if you’re hungry now and ready for an early dinner, there are so many top restaurants in Tel Aviv (both around Rothschild Boulevard and beyond) that you will be spoilt for choice.3.Tel Aviv Sightseeing on Foot: TheComplete RouteFor those who have both curiosity and stamina, this one’s for you since not only do you get the above, but also the chance to explore a picturesque and ancient city (which, in case you didn’t know, is actually joined up with Tel Aviv, to make one singular municipality.In the afternoon, follow the steps of our ‘basic’ walking tour but in the morning, begin in the beautiful and historic city of Jaffa, a magical place that really has a flavor all of its own.St. Peter's Church in JaffaStart at the famous Clock Tower (built in Ottoman times) on Yefet Street and then walk five minutes towards the famous Jaffa Flea Market. Once you’ve enjoyed some browsing and coffee, head towards the Mediterranean, via Abrasha Park. Not only will it offer you some stunning panoramic views, but it’s also home to the beautiful Catholic church of St. Peter’s (with an interior that resembles a European cathedral!)Pause at the Wishing Bridge (with all of its zodiac signs) then stroll over to the famous Biblical statue ‘The Gate of Faith’ - made of Galilee stone, which depicts famous events from the Hebrew Bible. Head on to the famous ‘suspended Orange Tree’ and look out to the sea, to Andromeda’s rock. The Suspended Orange Tree (Image source: vivali CC BY 3.0)Then take a wander around the nearby Artist’s Quarter and pop into some of the studios, to meet the people behind the jewelry, paintings, and sculptures on offer - beautiful as gifts and perfect as souvenirs from Israel to take home!From there, you can walk all the way along the beach, via the Carmel Market, and arrive for your afternoon at Bialik Street.For sure, it’s easy to follow any of these walking tour instructions but if you really want the inside story (the history, the culture, the food, the people) then why not consider taking a guided Tel Aviv tour? It’s an ideal way to get the most out of your time and with the services of someone who knows Tel Aviv and Jaffa well, and can answer all your questions (and step in, should you need translations from Hebrew to English!) you’ll see and experience an enormous amount in one day.Tel Aviv is much more than just lovely beaches!If you’re traveling to Israel and want to make the most of your time in the country, we also offer a wide range of day trips, like guided tours in Jerusalem, trips to the Dead Sea, Masada voyages, and much, much more.Feel free to contact us by email or phone for more information and if you’re curious about Israel, take a look at our blog which takes a deep dive into all things related to our country.
By Sarah Mann
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The White City - Tel Aviv and the Bauhaus Movement

Many people who’ve never visited Israel imagine it as a land filled with historic religious sites, ancient fortresses, amphitheaters dating back to the time of King Herod, and museums filled with archaeological treasures. And indeed, cities like Jerusalem, Akko, and Safed are just like that…extraordinary treasures in this Holy Land.What fewer people know is that there’s an exciting, dynamic modern side to the country and whilst no visitor to Jerusalem can fail to be moved by its beautiful stone buildings and Old City walls, don’t imagine a visit to Tel Aviv will disappoint - because it’s got an architectural style all of its own.And it’s called Bauhaus.This design movement has had an extraordinary impact on Tel Aviv and whilst it only began in the 1920’s, it’s shaped the city dramatically.Today, we’re looking at how this architectural style flourished on the streets of Dizengoff, Rothschild and Allenby and why you make time to look at some of its most beloved buildings, when you’re in town.Bauhaus building in Tel AvivWhat is Bauhaus style?‘Bauhaus’ (sometimes referred to as ‘international style’) refers to architecture, furniture, and objects that arose from an early 20th-century design school in Germany, founded by Walter Gropius. Putting the emphasis on functionality and rationality, the Bauhaus style always took the view that ‘less is more’.A typical Bauhaus building, therefore, will always put function above form containing classic modernist elements from curved balconies and ribbon windows (Corbusier style) to white exteriors and outdoor communal spaces - elements you’ll see in Bauhaus buildings all over Tel Aviv today. With their clean lines, lack of decorations, and flat roofs (designed so residents could plant gardens, hang laundry, sleep outside or simply socialize) they are unmissable.When did the Bauhaus movement take off in Tel Aviv?The rise of Bauhaus in Tel Aviv was a direct result of the immigration of thousands of Jews who fled Germany (mainly after the rise of the Nazi party) and arrived in the Holy Land (then controlled by the British Mandate). Between the late 1920’s and early 1940’s, they arrived en masse, hopeful for the eventual establishment of the State of Israel.Tel Aviv's Hertzl Street back in 1930 (Image source: Moshe Ordmann)In the meantime, Tel Aviv was a very young city (it had only been founded in 1910) and so the architects who had immigrated set about their work with gusto. In twenty years, around 4,000 buildings were constructed in this style. They were built in a very practical way, painted white (to reflect the heat in what was a very hot climate), and had a very distinct style!Moreover, adopting the ‘International Style’ in Tel Aviv made economic sense - the country was anything but affluent and so low construction costs were considered to be a major plus for the project.What were the social principles behind the Bauhaus movement?Many of the German Jewish architects who arrived in Tel Aviv were both social and zionist and at the heart of their Bauhaus philosophy was the idea of the collective. Focusing on the idea of ‘social living’ their aim was to build a society of equals and this was reflected in their architecture.Houses they designed had equal surfaces - they were rectangular with flat roofs, the aim being to have equality between top and bottom, and front and back. Each part of the building should support another As with the school building and, in many cases, these buildings looked out onto green, communal spots. These architects were not political revolutionaries - rather they harked back to old ideas of utopian socialism and the idea of belonging to a people.Where can I see Bauhaus buildings in Tel Aviv?With four thousand of them still standing (half of which are protected under preservation laws) Tel Aviv boasts the largest collection of Bauhaus buildings in the world today - and they couldn’t be easier to see, either as part of a Tel Aviv-guided tour or just wandering the city’s streets.Bauhaus building in Rotschild Boulevard, Tel Aviv (Image source: Artem.G CC BY-SA 4.0)Many of the buildings can be found in three distinct areas - Rothschild Boulevard and it’s sidestreets (the historic part of the city), Dizengoff Square and the surrounding area (Dizengoff is regarded by many as Tel Aviv’s most lively and action-packed street) and Bialik Street, close to Allenby and the Carmel Market.There are so many that are worth hunting out but some of the real beauties include:The Cinema Hotel, Dizengoff Street - once a popular Israeli cinema, today it’s a beautiful boutique hotel with a wonderful roof terrace boasting views across the Mediterranean.Krieger House, Rothschild Boulevard - built in 1934, it’s still owned by the family of the famous Tel Aviv physician Moshe Krieger, and it’s been beautifully renovated.Bruno House, Strauss Street - constructed by Ze’ev Haller in 1933, it’s a real classic - everything is plain and white.Nahmani Street 43 - once known as the ‘Red house’ this three storey building, constructed in 1923, was once a textile factory.Bauhaus Museum, Bialik Street - inside this stunning building there’s a small gallery space where you can learn more about the history of design in the White City.Is Bauhaus the reason why Tel Aviv is known as the White City?Yes! The collection of modernist buildings (all painted white) is so famous that in 2003 UNESCO placed them on a World Heritage List as ‘an outstanding example of new town planning and architecture in the early 20th century.” Indeed, Tel Aviv is the only city in the world that is today home to such a large and wonderful collection.Perhaps one of the best ways to really see these unique buildings, up close and personal, is on a walking tour of Tel Aviv. A local guide can really give you the lowdown on what makes this architectural style so special, show you backstreet buildings that you might not find alone, and answer all your questions about why they have become such desirable residences today.Bauhaus building near Dizengoff Street (Image source: Artem.G CC BY-SA 4.0)Finally, don’t forget to visit the Bauhaus Center on Dizengoff Street. It has a lovely gallery and a marvelous shop, full of books, posters, design objects, and even fridge magnets (all perfect if you’re looking for souvenirs from Israel).Whether you’re visiting Israel for the first time, or returning to see more of the country, why not consider taking one of our day trips? We also offer guided Tel Aviv tours, where you can explore food markets and learn about local the Tel Aviv graffiti scene. email or phone and to learn more about the history, culture, and daily life of our country take a look at our blog.
By Sarah Mann
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Habima Square

Plan Your VisitOpen Times:24/7Prices:FreeAverage Visit Duration:30 minutes to 1 hour.Popular Times:During the evening when shows are about to start or about to finish, the plaza fills with people. Special Events:There are often scheduled events in the Square that are advertised in the media.Relevant Tours:As one of the most iconic destinations in the city, a walking tour of Tel Aviv will probably include Habima Square. You can also add this attraction to Private Tel Aviv tours.This public space is the hub of Tel Aviv’s cultural scene. It is a large open plaza, but you’ll see theaters, restaurants, and concert halls in every direction you look. Habima Square gardenNot only that but the Square is often used as the venue for special events. You’ll find Habima Square at the intersection of Tel Aviv's two most important streets, Dizengoff Street and Rothschild Boulevard. It is a place to meet, to hang out, and to enjoy a relaxed atmosphere.The Square features a sunken garden where local trees and vegetation have been planted such as lavender, almond trees, and cacti. If you visitTel Aviv with kids, theycan play and you can sit while watching buskers entertain the crowds. Different parts of the Square have different atmospheres, some corners are quiet while other places are dynamic and busy. There is a peaceful water basin, benches, statues, and of course the magnificent architecture that surrounds the Square.Habima Theater building, on the western side of the square (Image source: xiquinhosilva CC BY 2.0)You’ll know you’ve reached Habima Square when you see a sculpture of three giant steel discs balancing one on top of the other at an angle, and reaching upwards. This iconic sculpture was created by Menashe Kadishman, and completed in 1976. It was meant to represent the economic instability at the time.History of Habima SquareThe idea for a cultural plaza was part of the original plan for Tel Aviv, laid out by Patrick Geddes in the late 1920s. When the Habima Theater was constructed in the early 1940s, the Square was a natural continuation of the cultural space next to the theater. Slowly other cultural venues were built in the vicinity.Pro Tip:At the time of writing, parking in the parking lot underneath the Square costs 32 ILS for 2 hours. There is an elevator directly from the parking lot to the Square.Habima Square at night (Image source: Oren Rozen CC BY-SA 3.0)Habima Square, as we see it today, was designed by the Israeli artist Dani Karavan and completed in 2010 together with the underground parking. Several of the Square features pay homage to the early landscape of this area, such as the sandboxes where kids play that represent the dunes, and the sunken garden that represents the vegetation that once covered the ground.Pro Tip:The name Habima means “the stage”, and it is sometimes also called “The Orchestra Plaza”.Cultural Institutions Around Habima SquareHabima:Israel’s National TheaterCultural Palace(Heichal HaTarbut): Was formerly named Mann Auditorium, and is today known as Charles Bronfman Auditorium. The venue is home to the Philharmonic Orchestra of Israel and is the largest concert hall in Tel Aviv.Eyal Ofer Pavilion for Contemporary Art:Formerly the Helena Rubinstein Pavilion for Contemporary Art. One of the most important art museums in the country.If you’re interested in architecture, and the buildings of Tel Aviv’sWhite City,then take a look around Habima Square where several of the structures are in the international style.Cultural attractions nearby include:Joseph Bau House Museum, 5min walkTzavta Theater, 6 min walkTel Aviv Cinematheque, 8min walkSarona Center, 11 min walkCameri Theater, 13 min walkWhat Happens at Habima Square?Often nothing happens at Habima Square at all. People come and go crossing the Square to get to where they’re going, locals stop to eat their lunch in the sun and then move on, and theatergoers park their cars in the underground parking beneath the Square then ascend to find their venue.Over the last few years the plaza has been the focal point for public events such as the housing protest in 2011, the opening ceremony of the 2019Eurovision, and in 2023-24, tens of thousands of Israelis gathered here to rally for the return of hostages.
By Petal Mashraki
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Tel Aviv Museum of Art

Plan Your VisitOpen Times: Sunday-Tuesday closed. Wednesday-Thursday 10:00-16:00; Friday 10:00-14:00, and Saturday 10:00-18:00. Prices: Regular price: 50 ILS; people with disabilities, students, and residents of Tel Aviv-Jaffa 40 ILS, and senior citizens (Israeli and foreign) 25 ILS. Entrance is free for museum members, visitors under 18 years old; journalists, escorts of disabled persons, tour guides, and recruited army reservists (order 8). You need to show your relevant valid certificate or ID for the discount. The entrance fee provides a one-time entry to the museum. Pro Tip: If you have a Guggenheim Artpass, The Cultivist, or Sotheby’s Preferred membership entrance is free.Average Visit Duration: 1-3 hoursPopular Times: Mid-day. Pro Tip: Last entry one hour before closing time.Special Events: The museum hosts regular temporary exhibitions, family events, activities, workshops, guided tours, and Friday cinema. See the museum website for a calendar of upcoming events. Relevant Tours: Take a private Tel Aviv tour and see this popular attraction with a guide. If you're a true lover of art, try a Tel Aviv Graffiti tour as well.A visit to Tel Aviv is incomplete without a stop at the Tel Aviv Art Museum. It is one of the most important art museums in the country and holds a superb collection of contemporary and modern art from Israel and abroad. Enjoy grand art in Tel Aviv!The art ranges from well-known pieces to experimental works. The exhibits range from visual arts and design to architecture and installations. You don’t have to be an art-lover to enjoy this museum as the exhibits will surprise and delight visitors of all ages and artistic inclinations.History of the Tel Aviv Museum of ArtThis was Israel’s first art museum, established by Tel Aviv’s first mayor, Meir Dizengoff in 1932. It was part of his plan to turn Tel Aviv into a cultural hub, and he used his connections to gather donations of artwork to display in the new museum. Dizengoff let the lower level of his private residence become the museum’s first home and he continued to live on the upper floor of the house. When Dizengoff passed away in 1936 he bequeathed the museum to the Tel Aviv municipality with the request that it remain a museum.From its initial opening, the museum boasted an impressive collection of pieces by artists such as Chagall, Modigliani, and Reuven Rubin. The museum was a great success and continued to add valuable works to the collection.Artwork in the MuseumIn 1948, Israel’s independence was declared in the presence of Ben Gurion at the museum building. Pro Tip: Delve into this part of Israel’s history with a visit to the original museum building, now Independence Hall at 16 Rothschild Boulevard in Tel Aviv.With the establishment of the State of Israel, the museum moved from its temporary home into the purpose-built Helena Rubinstein Pavilion in 1959. Soon it became clear that the building was not big enough to house the growing collection. So a new museum building was constructed on Shaul Hamelech Boulevard.In 2011, the Herta and Paul Amir Building was inaugurated alongside the main museum building on Shaul Hamelech Boulevard. It more than doubled the museum space and now workshops, gatherings, events, and a family gallery could be accommodated. Now with over a million visitors a year, and international recognition the museum is among the top hundred visited museums in the world. Pro Tip: The Helena Rubinstein Pavilion was renamed the Eyal Ofer Pavilion and was completely renovated in 2023.What to See at the Tel Aviv Museum of ArtThe categories of artwork on display include Israeli art; contemporary art; modern art; drawings; prints; photography; design; architecture, and 16th-19th century European art.See works by Gustav Klimt, Lichtenstein, Kandinsky, van Gogh, Maurycy Gottlieb, Jackson Pollock, Pissarro, Monet, Samuel Hirzenberg, Joan Miro, Picasso, and Henry Moore. Pro Tip: The museum also has an extensive art library.The Buildings of the Tel Aviv Museum of ArtThe Tel Aviv Museum of Art has three buildings, spread across two campuses - one on Shaul Hamelech Boulevard and the other on Tarset Avenue.Tel Aviv Museum of Art, main building also known as the Paulson Family Foundation Building at 27 Shaul Hamelech Boulevard. Home to the museum’s permanent collection and temporary exhibitions. The designers of the museum were chosen through a competition won by architects Dan Eitan and Itzhak Yashar. They designed the building in the Israeli Brutalist style, inspired by the architecture of public structures in Tel Aviv from the 1950s to 70s. The interior has a spiral design of four galleries surrounding a tall open central atrium. The galleries are minimalistic and painted white so there are no distractions from the artwork on display. This museum building is home to temporary exhibitions, the Younes & Soraya Nazarian Family Experimental Center, sculpture gardens, restaurants, a gift store, a visitor center, and more.The Museum buildingHerta and Paul Amir Building, adjacent to the main building on Shaul Hamelech Boulevard. The building is a work of art in its own right and exhibits Israeli art, photography, visual arts, and temporary exhibitions. This is the most recent addition to the museum. The building was designed by Prof. Preston Scott Cohen in collaboration with Amit Nemlich. The exterior has a striking appearance, made of 465 panels of polished concrete set at angles to resemble an Origami-like surface. Inside the gallery space is around a central “light fall” atrium with a vertical space under a skylight that lets in natural light. There are five floors, three below ground level.Eyal Ofer Pavilion (former Helena Rubinstein Pavilion) located on Tarset Avenue, was designed by Zeev Rechter, Yacov Rechter, and Dov Karmi, and was inaugurated in 1959.What Facilities Are There at the Museum?Fully accessible, including ramps, adapted restrooms, free wheelchair rental, hearing-aid systems, and accessible parking.Food and drinks: Grab something to eat at the museum’s Studio Cafe or Pastel restaurant in the main building, or enjoy the Helena contemporary wine bar at the Eyal Ofer Pavilion.Cloakroom service (5 ILS deposit)Pro Tip: Both of the museum locations are conveniently located minutes from iconic cultural buildings. On Shaul Hamelech Boulevard you’ll be near the Israeli Opera House and the Cameri Theater, and at the Eyal Ofer Pavilion on Tarsat Avenue, you’ll be alongside Israel’s national theater, Habima, and the Charles Bronfman Auditorium.
By Petal Mashraki
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Digital Nomadism in Israel: The Complete Guide

So you’re thinking of being a digital nomad in Israel? Every digital nomad will need to ask themselves a few key questions about cost, safety, WiFi access, cultural differences, and general quality of life in their new ‘temporary home’ before they book their flight ticket. Digital nomads who visit Israel for the first time can testify: It's easier than in Europe! most nationalities receive a free 90-day visa on arrival, English is widely spoken (as well as French, Russian, Arabic, and Spanish) and the country’s incredibly diverse population and unusual places to hang your hat means that a working holiday in the holy land has never been more simple to organize.Israel is a great spot for Digital Nomads; keep reading and learn why!Below we’ll try and answer some of your questions before you arrive, what we think are the best cities in Israel for digital nomads, as well as a few tips on what to do when you’ve finished your work and are looking for some fun!Is Israel safe?Although you might not think so on reading the news, Israel’s actually an extremely safe country to travel and work in. The crime rate is very low, the streets are very safe to walk at night and women travelling alone here will feel very comfortable.A local co-working spaceOf course, periodically there are ‘flare-ups’ but most of these happen in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, so the chances are you’ll be far removed from trouble. Moreover, Israelis are hospitable and helpful and love to meet strangers, so the chances are that if you do have a difficult experience, it will be ‘offset’ by kindness and generosity.Is Israel Cheap?We have to be honest, Israel is not a cheap destination, and while a short 2-day trip to Tel Aviv won't be expensive, living there is another story. However, once you’ve shelled out for accommodation, you can keep your budget down by buying produce at local markets, eating Israeli street food,and enjoying all kinds of cheap or free activities (hiking, cycling, beach outings).The food is great, and the people are laid-backThe country is jammed full of national parks, nature reserves, ancient fortresses, holy sites, fantastic Israeli Museums, and galleries, many of which cost little or nothing to enter. So if you budget accordingly, working remotely in Israel won’t be as eye-wateringly expensive as some people tell you.What are the best cities in Israel to be a Digital Nomad?Israel’s a small country with an enormous amount going on, but if we had to choose five cities in which we think you could enjoy yourself, these are it…Digital Nomads In Tel AvivVibrant, dynamic, international, buzzy, and 24/7 - these are some of the words visitors use after they’ve spent time in Tel Aviv, aka the Non-Stop City. The lovely port of Jaffa is just a short ride from the city centerFrom beaches and boutique stores to Bauhaus architecture and some top restaurants, Tel Aviv is a place it’s hard not to fall in love with. There are so many charming neighborhoods to base yourself in - including Neve Tzedek, Kerem Hateimanim (the Yemenite Quarter), and Florentin - that you; 'll soon feel like a local.What to do in your free time:Wander in ancient Jaffa, rummage in the flea market, stroll through the artist's quarter, and sit at the port, staring out at the beautiful blue sea. There are some great guided walking tours in Jaffa you can take to learn what's where and discover the city's awesome history. Take a food tour in Carmel Market, wander around Rothschild Boulevard (full of Bauhaus buildings), and enjoy a cocktail at one of the city’s most fashionable bars.Spend time at Tel Aviv’s pristine beaches - with white sand and clear water, they’re perfect for sunbathing, watching sunsets, and walking on at night. Check out this guide to find the best beaches in Tel Aviv.Digital Nomads In JerusalemEvocative, mysterious, beautiful, sacred, magical - Jerusalem has beguiled visitors for as long as we can imagine and that’s not going to change any time soon. Visit the walls of JerusalemThe capital of Israel, and home to three major world religions, there’s no place like it - stay in hipster Nachlaot, trendy Emek Refaim, or the historic German Colony, and either walk downtown or jump on the Jerusalem light railway.What to do in your free time: truly, you are spoilt for choice!Explore the 2000-year-old Old City (home to three world religions and sites such as the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Dome of the Rock and Western Wall)Visit the world-famous Israel Museum, Yad Vashem Holocaust Monument, Ein Kerem, and Yemin Mosheneighborhoods, and head to the lively Mahane Yehuda market for street food and beer.Take a day trip to Masada and the Dead Sea - marvel at the views of the Judean desert from atop an ancient Herodian fortress then chill out and float in waters so salty no living thing can survive there.Digital Nomads In HaifaThe capital of Israel’s north, Haifa is a big hidden gem - it doesn’t have the glamour of Tel Aviv or the notoriety of Jerusalem but it’s beautiful, charming, historic, and also a much cheaper place to stay in Israel than other big cities.The Bahai Gardens of HaifaLook for a place in Wadi NisNas (a Christian-Arab neighborhood, famous for its falafel joints), the German Colony (established by Templars), or Ahuza (with many students and English speakers). Built on the slopes of Mount Carmel, it’s a safe and green city, with wonderful views of the Mediterranean.What to do in your free time:Enjoy the Carmel National Park, which is on your back door. Known as ‘Little Switzerland’ it’s full of woodlands, streams, and hiking trails.Wander through the Bahai Gardens, the most beautiful in the Middle East.Take anAcre and Caesariatourto see the ancient Crusader City, and the famous city built by King Herod and boasting some very impressive archaeological ruins; Don't missRosh HaNikra (home to beautiful grottoes), all easily accessible by train and bus.Digital Nomads In EilatEilat’s got a reputation for being a party city in Israel and, for sure, it’s a good place to chill out. Nestled on the Red Sea, close to both the Egyptian and Jordanian borders, it receives almost no rain and is a great place to head if you enjoy scuba diving, sailing, eating dinner by the water, and rocking nightlife.How about working right next to the sea?Eilat is a smallish city (population around 52,000) but growing - neighborhoods worth looking into include Amdar (close to the seafront), Shahmon (quiet and residential), or a nearby kibbutz (all of which rent accommodation privately and are between 20-40 minutes north by bus).What to do in your free time:Visit the magical Dolphin Reef and Coral World ObservatoryDo some hiking in Timna Park, just 20 20-minute drive north, and home to an ancient copper mine and weird and wonderful rock formations.Discover Joradan! there are manyPetra and Wadi Rum guided toursthat will show you the Lost City of Petra, a marvel that must be seen.Digital Nomads In NazarethNazareth is Israel’s largest Arab city and also home to one of Israel’s most famous churches, the Basilica of the Annunciation, where an angel visited Mary and told her she would give birth to Jesus. Dating back to Roman and Byzantine times, it has a bustling market and several religious sites, and particularly fascinating for Christian pilgrims.Feel the magic ofNazarethNazareth is cheaper to stay in than other cities in Israel, and probably the best place to stay is in or around the Old City, which is beautiful and fascinating, or perhaps up in the hills, which is quieter and wonderfully pastoral.What to do in your free time:Explore around! take aGalilee 2-day trip: it is a stunningly beautiful area and extremely special for Christian pilgrims since it is where Jesus spent much of his adult life ministering.Hike in one of the many national parks in northern Israel - from the Bunias waterfalls to the Tiberias hot springs, there’s natural beauty at every turn.Take aGolan Heights tourand visit boutique wineries, take a jeep tour along the border with Syria, and hang out with young Israelis in the regional capital of Katzrin.Finally, if you’d like any further information about the organized packages, day tours, and privately-guided trips that we offer across the country, feel free to contact us by email or phone and, in the meantime, take a look at our blog, where you can find out much more about life in Israel.
By Sarah Mann
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Drinking in Israel: The Best Pubs in Every City

Coming to Israel and looking for places to grab a drink and a bite whilst you’re enjoying your holiday? Well, you won’t have a problem finding watering holes because all across the country, you’ll find all kinds of bars, pubs, and nightclubs in which to enjoy yourself.Indeed, whilst located in the Middle East, Israel has a pretty relaxed attitude towards drinking and, like many other Mediterranean countries, alcohol is considered a very normal part of socializing. Many cafes and bars stay open until very late (or until the last customer leaves); in Tel Aviv (the ‘Non-Stop City’) there has been an explosion of neighborhood cafes and cocktail bars, many of which are crowded until the wee small hours.What’s the Drinking Age in Israel?The legal drinking age in Israel is 18 although establishments might not let in someone under the age of 23-25. You may be asked for proof of age so it’s a good idea to have some kind of ID on you, especially if you're going to a nightclub.The local crowd is super friendly!Also, bear in mind that it’s illegal to drink alcohol in public places between the hours of 11 pm-7 am. This means that if the police catch you sitting on the beach with a bottle of beer, technically they can force you to pour it away!What are Local Israeli Beers Like?If you’re a beer drinker, chances are you might be interested in trying a local offering whilst in Israel and there are a few to choose from, including Goldstar, Maccabee, Taibe, and Nesher.Goldstar Beer on tap (Image Source: Koriela CC BY-SA 3.0)The most iconic and popular of these is Goldstar, a dark lager that comes in at 4.9% alcohol and takes the lion’s share of the market. Maccabee - a classic German-style Pilsner - is another popular lager. Taibe is a Palestinian beer that you’ll find in many Tel Aviv bars and Nesher (which means ‘eagle’ in Hebrew) is famous for its non-alcoholic beer, which tastes rather like American root beer.Boutique Wineries in IsraelAnd for those who aren’t so into beer, In the last couple of decades, Israel’s wine industry has exploded and today, all over the country, from the Jerusalem hills to the Galilee and the Golan Heights you can find fantastic Israeli boutique vineyards, where you can visit for tastings and cheese & wine events.Wine in IsraelAnd notwithstanding that Israel has the perfect climate and good soil for this kind of venture, in the Hebrew Bible grapes are one of the ‘seven species’ and wine is something used routinely by orthodox Jews when making sabbath blessings.Cocktail Bars in IsraelCocktail bars are all the rage now in Israel and whether you’re a traditionalist looking for a stiff martini or Old Fashioned, or ready to let the mixologist in front of you whisk up some astonishing creations, the choice is yours. Warning - alcohol isn’t cheap in Israel and cocktails can really burn through your wallet, so if you’re looking to drink without breaking the bank, show up at Happy Hour.Local cocktails are masterfully crafted, and just great!Many Tel Aviv cocktail bars are also amusingly themed - Spicehaus on Dizengoff Street serves their creations in thermos flasks and the waiters wear white lab coats and Double Standard (up the road) serves their Bloody Marys in IV bags! Bellboy on Rothschild Boulevard has a classic 1920s Speakeasy vibe and the Imperial’s bar is stylish to a fault (our tip: Order their ‘Bullet to the Head’)What about Israeli tap water? Can I drink it?You’ll be pleased to know that tap water in Israel is perfectly safe to drink and - even better - all over the country you’ll see public water fountains where you can refill your bottle (and by the way, this is something you really should do, especially in the summer when it’s easy to dehydrate very quickly).Of course, if you’re hankering after mineral water, both still and sparkling varieties are widely available in every small store and supermarket and on restaurant and bar menus.So, where should you go to enjoy yourself? Below, here are some of our suggestions for places to quench your thirst in Israel’s four most visited cities…The Best Pubs in Tel AvivTel Aviv is the nightlife mecca of Israel and the best place for some bar hopping: The atmosphere is very open and locals will gladly talk to a friendly tourist. Note that the music tends to get loud on the weekend, and popular places are understandably crowded.Drink together, then go party!The trick is to go out on weekdays: Mondays are usually the most relaxed day. You can also try arriving early, around 21:00, and grab a seat at the bar - talk to the bartender, and get a feel of the place. Don't be surprised if you'll leave the pub with a group of friends, and have an adventure in Tel Aviv!Molly BloomsGuinness on tap, shepherd’s pie and fish & chips, live music and football screenings make this Irish pub a ‘go to’ hangout in Tel Aviv and St, Patrick’s Day is a regular riot.Molly Blooms, Mendeli 82, Tel: 055 886-0188MinzarAn institution with locals, the Minzar (‘Monastery’ in Hebrew) has a great beer selection at competitive prices and a cool, laid-back, and very unpretentious vibe.Minzar, Allenby 60, Tel: 03 517-3015Lily Rose cold beer, tasty pizza (they bring it from the Italian joint across the street!), and good vibes make this neighborhood pub a great place to make new friends.Lily Rose, Shlomo Ibn Givrol 148, Tel: 050 373-2263Mike’s PlaceFamous in Tel Aviv for its atmosphere, live music, and international clientele, Mike's Place is a fantastic spot to watch sports (from European soccer to American football), order fries, nachos, onion rings, and burgers, then swig down a few beers.Mike’s Place, Herbert Samuel 90, Tel: 03 510-6392The Best Pubs in JerusalemThe Jerusalem nightlife has special energies you don't find in Tel Aviv: people are open for conversations, and you'll find lots of people from other countries.Easy-going, fun atmosphereJerusalem offers a more classic atmosphere with its ancient stone walls and tight alleyways - and many people say that the food is much better at Jerusalem pubs. Here are the best pubs in Jerusalem - just go out and try one!Beer BazaarOffering the biggest selection of craft beer in Israel, Beer Bazaar serves bottles and draft microbrews and boasts super friendly staff. (Fun fact: they even serve gluten-free ale!) Wash your drink down with some hotdog and soak up the vibes in Mahane Yehuda Market, an ultra-cool Jerusalem location.Beer Bazaar Etz Hayim 3, Mahane Yehuda Market, Tel: 058 784-1626The BarrelFriendly staff and a great atmosphere beer make this place popular both with tourists and locals. Order a burger and sweet potato fries with your beer and you’ll quickly feel like you're in heaven. And open until 4 am, you can make a night of it…The Barrel, Hillel 13, Tel: 054-227-5321HatchFamed for its buffalo wings and corned beef sandwiches, Hatch has a smaller selection of beers than Beer Bazaar but it’s solid, and the informed staff make it a great place to spend an evening. A tried and tested Jerusalem favorite.Hatch, Ha Egoz 26-28, Mahane Yehuda Market, Tel: 058 626-2017GenerationOpen on Shabbat (which is a big deal in a city where most things are shut), this Haifa bar has a warm atmosphere, inexpensive drinks (as well as a Happy Hour), and karaoke evenings. (Fun fact: it’s popular with Russians, and even more so since it changed its name from ‘Putin).Hatch, Ha Egoz 26-28, Mahane Yehuda Market, Tel: 058 626-2017The Best Pubs in HaifaThere's something about Port Cities that creates a certain vibe, more relaxed and inviting; Maybe it's the centuries of trading with strangers that makes locals easier to approach - maybe something in the salty air.A pub party, open for all!Haifa is no different: this is the most laid-back city in Israel, and drinking here is a great experience for visitors who want to have fun without running wild. Visit one of these pubs, and you'll see for yourself.IzaInformal and fun, this place serves cheap food plus plenty of beer and liquor,r and the music - 90’s rock and pop - will take you back! Get there early to avoid waiting for a seat.Iza, Moshe Aharon 1, Tel: 058 746-0202After DarkGood vibes and a decent selection of boutique beers make this pub a good choice for a night out, even though it can get noisy and crowded. If you like 80’s rock, you’re in for a treat.After Dark, Derech Jaffa 30, Tel: 053 521-6076LibiraSituated in old Haifa, close to the port, this pub has been around forever but is always good fun,n and their beer offerings are well-priced and local. Open late and they offer a sharing menu too (since they aren’t kosher, you’re in luck if you like pork sausages).Libira, Ha Namal 26, Tel: 04 374-0251The DukeThis is one of the most famous pubs in Haifa and with good reason. The bar is stocked with both local and imported beers, the decor is stylish, the food is consistently good and the volume of the music is such that you can enjoy it and have a conversation too!The Duke, Moriah 107, Tel: 04 834-7282The Best Pubs in EilatEilat is all about youth, quick getaways, and parties - and its pub scene won't disappoint travelers looking for a good time: The parties go on and on, the music scares the fish, and the crowd is usually younger - especially during Summer. Friends drinking near the beachIf you'll party all night long, you can see visitors heading to the border station, on their way to take tours in Petra, the famous Lost City. Here are the best spots in Eilat:Paddy’sClose to the beach and open on Shabbat, Paddy’s is a great place for both beer and tequila, and they serve fantastic steaks, salads,s and wings. Football fans will love the big screens and there are snooker tables upstairs.Paddy’s, Yotam 1, Te: 08 637-0921 The Three MonkeysClose to the Royal Beach Hotel, this pub has a diverse beer menu, plenty of live music,c and a mixed clientele. A bit noisy but you can always escape to the patio area!The Three Monkeys, Pa’amei ha Shalom 23, Tel: 08 636-8989The BreweryThis place is aptly named - they brew their beer (they offer samples before you order) and are perpetually adding new additions to the menu. The food comes highly recommended, including calamari for seafood lovers and the Beyond Burger for the veggies.The Brewery, Ha Orgim 2, Tel: 08 935-0550Drinkin’ BarWith good music and offering a wide variety of beers, cocktails, and chasers at cheap prices, this is a good place to head if you’re on a budget, and it’s a slap bang in the center of Eila if you want to head on to a nightclub.Drinkin’ Bar, Yotam 1, Tel: 054 255-5949The Morning After Hangover In IsraelIsrael does not support hangovers, especially as there are so many ways to prevent them, just lying all around you! Remember to drink a glass of water between Beers and Shots, and eat something before you go to sleep; Street food in Israel is cheap and delicious, and the places serving it are open as long as the pubs are. After a night of drinking with new friends, you can grab an awesomeIsraeli breakfastand continue exploring: There are highly recommended guided tours in Tel Aviv, professionally guided trips in Jerusalem, and many more opportunities to make your visit unforgettable. Check out our travel blog to learn more!
By Sarah Mann
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The Best Pizza in Tel Aviv [Taste-Tested!]

It’s sometimes hard to imagine that three simple ingredients - flour, water and yeast - made into a dough and then topped with juicy tomatoes and cheese could wow the world as it does. But pizza makes the ‘top five favorite foods’ list of so many and, in Tel Aviv, like the rest of the world, everyone’s on the hunt for the best slice.Luckily, it’s not just the top restaurants in Tel Aviv where you can eat well because this is a city that’s raised its pizza game in the last few years. So whether you’re looking for special sourdough recipes, gourmet pizzas with incredible toppings, or a simple New York-style slice, you won’t be disappointed. Here’s our guide to the best pizza in every corner of Tel Aviv:1. LilaIf you love pizza, but you hate waiting in line, then swallow your hatred because they don’t take reservations at Lila but the wait is truly worth it. Located in Florentine, close to the hip and happening Levisty Market - one of the best markets in Tel Aviv - it’s popular both with locals and international visitors - not just because of its tasty pizzas but its relaxed and friendly vibe.Great ingredients, great pizzaOur team of eaters has to recommend two particular creations - the bacon and maple and the onion jam pizza! Their ‘personal’ sizes are big, with crunchy Neapolitan dough, and there are plenty of veggie toppings and vegan cheese options too. For dessert, order their ice cream or a piece of their homemade chocolate cake. Lila’s is always crowded, but once you’ve tried it you will become a convert.2. Nono AngeloIt’s authentic as it comes at Nono Angelo in Tel Aviv’s Old North (a minute’s walk from the Hilton beach) where two brothers (born and raised in Italy) serve up tasty thin-crust pizza in a warm and welcoming environment.Nono Angelo Pizza (Image source: The official Nono Angelo website)Whether you plump for the marguerite, the artichoke, and mushroom or one with vegan cheese, you’ll feel good afterward... they also serve salads, pasta, risotto, and delicious appetizers in the form of arancini and mozzarella sticks, for anyone that’s come with an appetite.With old-style charm and plenty of Italian music and atmosphere, linger a while, with some dessert and an espresso, sit outside and people watch and just for a moment you’ll feel that you’re in Rome! Just bear in mind that Nono Angelois a kosher dairy spot (so no meat toppings) and therefore closed on the Jewish sabbath.3. HaPIzzaThis local spot on lively Bograshov Street, in downtown Tel Aviv, has had a tried and tested reputation for pizza since it opened in 2007, and the fact that it’s always packed is testimony to this. With its open kitchen and chefs twirling up their dough in front of you, take your pick of veggie pizzas (no meat toppings), homemade pasta, healthy salads, and fabulous offerings for those with a sweet tooth.Hapizza (Image source: The official Hapizza website)Ha Pizza is hip and happening, and you’ll probably have to wait about for a table to open up but with friendly but fast service, it shouldn’t be longer than 15-20 minutes, and - trust us - it’s well worth the wait. This is a quality ‘feel good’ spot that’s perfect for a date night - thin-crust pizza, a glass of chianti, and chocolate cake for dessert. What more could anyone ask for?4. The Green CatFor anyone vegan who has a hankering for pizza but without the dairy on top, there’s no place better to head than the Green Cat in south Tel Aviv. This cool little joint which plays hip music, and has a very laid-back vibe, is determined not to make you feel you’ve missed out, by using a very good cashew ‘mozzarella’ cheese atop its slices and pies, which is so good, many say they can’t tell it’s vegan!The Green Can (Image source: The official Green Cat website)The Green Cat uses high-end ingredients for its toppings, which include sweet potato, seitan strips (in place of pepperoni), and red onions and if you order a pie, you can put different toppings on each half. Service is friendly, the beer is on tap, and for those with a sweet tooth, they offer a vegan ice cream bar (our tip: try the malabi flavour). Next door is the Levontin 7, a bit of an alternative venue that has live music several times a week, so you can eat and enjoy some free entertainment at the same time—a must-visit.5. La TigreGet yourself down to south Tel Aviv to this if you love baked-to-order pizzas with fantastic sauce and a light dough (left to rise for 72 hours!) that’s specially fermented to form unique ‘tiger spot’ bubbles around the crust.La Tigre has a casual, informal ambiance with great Italian vibes - from the appetizers (sweet potato) to the drinks (think Aperol spritz and limonello) and serves unique flavor combinations, including the ‘Carbonara’ and pistachio with mortadella.La Tigre Pizza (Image source: The official Le Tigre website)There are plenty of vegetarian and vegan options too and if you’ve still got room afterward, try their roasted pineapple served with coconut ice cream. It’s incredible.6. Tony VespaTony Vespa has been around for a long time and a reason - it always comes up with the goods, in the form of pizza by the slice which is priced by weight. Whether you’re craving a few bites or want to indulge, just pick your toppings and tell them when to cut. The scales will tell you what you owe! And because their branches are on Rothschild Boulevard and Sarona (full of cocktail bars), it’s a great place to head if you’ve got the munchies.Tony Vespa Pizza (Image source: The official Tony Vespa website)Fresh, tasty, thin-crust slices are what you’ll get - from veggie to meat options, it’s all delicious and perfect for a ‘grab and go’ since there’s not much outside seating. We’d recommend the four-cheese bianca, or the sheep’s cheese and olives, but anything you choose will probably hit the spot. Not cheap, but from the crowds chomping on the sidewalk, you’ll know you’re going to be happy.7. PhilippePhillipe has to be included in this list because what they serve up is simply fantastic and consistently raved about by almost everyone in Tel Aviv who knows what good pizza is. A stone’s throw from the Cinematheque, it’s got a reputation for ‘gourmet’ creations and once you try one, you’ll understand why.A great place to grab a bite with your friendsBaked in a wood-burning oven, expect thin crusts and all kinds of toppings-from Merguez sausages to soft cheeses and a host of fabulous vegetables. Service is friendly and you can sit inside or outside. Our tip: try their ‘eggplant and pecan’ creation - it’s to die for - and if you have room for dessert, it's got to be the creme brulee.8. Har SinaiAnd back to south Tel Aviv, Har Sinai is a lively little spot to grab a slice (or something bigger) if you find yourself hungry in Florentin after midnight. They serve huge slices (and we mean huge - almost the size of two normal slices) for 19 NIS, with five to six different toppings to choose from, and their sourdough crust is super tasty and the tomato sauce is sweet and flavorsome.The Pepperoni is wonderful!The line can be long since Florentin is known for its party scene (and we all know how much you can yearn for carbs as the night wears on) but the staff are efficient and you won’t wait too long. There’s a small seating area outside or just stand on the sidewalk, along with the other revelers, and tuck in, washing things with a Red Stripe beer. Easily the best ‘grab and go’ option in this area after midnight proving that simple concepts are often the best!9. BrooklynIn the mood for some New York-style pizza? Then head over to one of the three branches of Brooklyn, which (as the name suggests) serves up huge slices of pizza that will leave you thinking you’ve crossed the Atlantic and are far from the White City.The toppings are incredible and generous - artichoke, pepperoni, ham, zucchini, beef (and many more) and all three of their locations are great for sitting outside and people-watching. The dough is made with love and care, the ingredients are fresh, they have a couple of vegan options and by Tel Aviv standards the prices are pretty affordable.Brooklyn Pizza (Image source: The official Brooklyn Pizza website)Whether you order a slice or go with a group and buy a pie, washed down with a bottle of beer (or a glass of their iced tea) you won’t leave disappointed.If you’re looking for things to do in the City that Never Sleeps, why not take one of our guided tours of Tel Aviv? From edgy street art to fabulous food markets and the beauty of ancient Jaffa’s port to fantastic Bauhaus architecture, we’ve got you covered. And if you want to head out of town, we also offer short trips around the country - you can take a short Jerusalem Tour,and see its famous grandeur or combine history and chillout time by visiting the Dead Sea and taking a tour of Masada fortress.Contact us by email or phone to find out more and if you're curious about life in Israel, check out our blog.
By Sarah Mann
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10 Best Art Museums in Tel Aviv: Jewish colors, International Fame

Tel Aviv’s an exciting, dynamic young city, and as well as its pulsating nightlife, sandy white beaches, and foodie culture, it’s also home to several excellent art museums and galleries, where old meets new and classic meets contemporary. Moreover, the city that never sleeps is also home to a thriving street art scene - so if you’re the kind of person who likes seeing art in every place you walk, consider taking a Tel Aviv Graffiti tour, where new creations appear on the walls of the Florentin, Jaffa,and Nahalat Binyamin neighborhoods almost every day.Whether you’re interested in classic or modern artworks, jewelry design, sculptures, and ceramics, or local street graffiti, get yourself down to some of these spots, to find out what the art scene in the White City is all about!1. Tel Aviv Museum of ArtWhen it comes to Tel Aviv galleries, your first stop has to be the Tel Aviv Museum of Art, which is the country’s largest art museum and home to a rather impressive collection of both temporary and permanent exhibits. Here you can see masterpieces by Chagall, Monet, Rodin, and Klimt (to name but a few).Inside the Tel Avi Museum of ArtThe museum also has plenty of temporary exhibits, areas relating to drawings and prints, as well as an entire section related to Israeli art from the early pre-state days. Outside, there’s a pretty sculpture garden, and the museum offers many activities for children. This museum is also a stone’s throw from the Sarona complex and its gourmet food market, which is a great place to wander around and stop for a bite to eat afterward.2. The Helena Rubinstein/Eyal Ofer PavillionAn annex of the Tel Aviv Museum of Art, this modest-looking pavilion was established in 1959 and named after Helena Rubenstein (founder of the eponymous cosmetics empire). Later on, when the city realized they needed more space, the Tel Aviv Museum of Art was set up and this pavilion was used for housing a library and space for temporary exhibitions which attracted artists both from Israel and across the globe. One of the artworks presented in the museum, byBen Hagari (Image source: The official Eyal Ofer Museum website)In the spring of 2023, after a substantial endowment was made by the Ofer family, ‘upgrading’ the space to museum requirements, the name was changed to the Eyal Ofer Museum of Contemporary Art. Kicking off a new reign with an outstanding exhibition devoted to Giacometti and his exquisite sculptures, it’s a bright and airy space that is likely to gain itself quite a reputation in years to come.3. Ramat Gan Museum of Israeli ArtJust outside of Tel Aviv lies the Ramat Gan Museum of Israeli Art which, as the name implies, is a home to Israeli art in all of its forms - paintings, sculpture, media, etc. Recently it has made a name for itself by unveiling over 200 works in the “B’aretz Ahavati” (In the Land of My Love) exhibition, which opened in September 2023.The Ramat Gan Art Museum (Image source: Talmoryair CC BY 3.0)Expect to see works by Menashe Kadishman, Moshe Huperfman, and Micha Ulman, as well as pieces by younger artists. It’s a small museum but well worth exploring if you’re in the neighborhood.4. Nahum Gutman Museum of ArtThis small but interesting museum can be found in the charming Neve Tzedek neighborhood and is dedicated to the artist Nachum Guttman who lived here. Born in Moldova (in what was then the Russian Empire), his family moved to Ottoman Palestine in 1905, Gutman pioneered a distinctly ‘Israeli’ style, moving away from European influences and working in several mediums, including pen and ink, watercolor, oils, and mosaics.Image source: Ran Erde, screenshot from the official Guttman Museum websiteThe Nachum Gutman Museum documents his memories of Tel Aviv and Jaffa, providing a fascinating glimpse into the lives of both Jews and Arabs living in the area at that time. As well as this, there are temporary exhibitions relating to photography, sculpture, ceramics, and watercolors, making this a lovely little place to pop into if you’re in the neighborhood.5. Rubin MuseumBorn in Romania, to a poor religious Jewish family, Reuben Ruben moved to Paris to study before emigrating to British Mandate Palestine in the early 1920s. He subsequently became a famous painter, drawing on Biblical themes and landscapes of the Holy Land in what today is known as the ‘Eretz Israel’ (‘Land of Israel’) style.One of Rubin's wonderful creations (Image source; The official Rubin Museum website)Today, you can visit the home where he both lived and painted - the Rubin museum is on the charming Bialik Street, just round the corner from the Carmel Market. Inside, there are many of his paintings, including landscapes of Galilee, Tel Aviv from early times, and ‘Jerusalem views’ as well as exhibits from Israeli artists. Since the studio has been preserved, you get a sense of who he was. And if you’re going with kids, don’t miss the children’s workshop that operates in the basement.6. Adina Plastelina StudioFor anyone curious about jewelry-making techniques, a visit to the Adina Plastelina studio in the Artist’s Quarter in Jaffa is a must. Founded in 2003 by designers Sam and Adi Leder, they found fame using the ancient technique of ‘Millefiori’ (in Italian, this means ‘one thousand flowers’). First used in the 14th century, using colorful glass rods fused together, the glass is pulled to make a thin cane, then cooled and cut into slices, and each piece looks like a flower!Video source: The official Adina Plastelina websiteUsing precious metals and polymer clay, these slices are set into molds, reheated, and fused to create unique jewelry. Adina Plastelina is situated in an old Ottoman building, which gives you an idea of the history of the area, and there’s a small ‘museum’ there too, with antiquities dug up during renovations. Afterward, take a walk by the harbor or stroll across to the Jaffa Flea Market (Shuk ha Pishpeshim’) to search for retro and vintage bargains from local merchants. If you want to explore the area and learn just how marvelous it is, you can always opt for a guided walking tour in Jaffa.7. Ilana Goor MuseumAlso situated in Old Jaffa, the Ilana Goor museum was established in 1995 by the artist herself and is home to a diverse collection of works, including drawings, paintings, sculptures, video art, antiques, and design objects. A mixture of pieces designed by Ms Goor herself and objects she collected on the world travels in the last five decades, what makes the museum even more special is that it’s her home and it’s quite possible you’ll bump into her whilst there.The Ilana Goor Museum (Image source: The official Ilana Goor Museum website)The stone building itself dates back to 1742 and was used as an inn by pilgrims journeying to Jerusalem. By the mid 19th century, it housed a factory that made olive oil and after 1948, part of the structure was home to a synagogue used by Libyan Jews. In 1983, Ilana Goor bought the building, hoping to use it to house her art collection and it seems that dream was realized!8. Center for Contemporary ArtIf edgy art is your thing, don’t miss the Centre for Contemporary Art, which, is aleading Israeli institution for the commissioning and presentation of experimental modern art in Tel Aviv. Designed to inspire, reflect, and provoke visitors, it offers a program of exhibits in Hebrew, Arabic, and English and has made a name for itself as a dynamic hub for creative types.Do you like Modern Art? TheCenter for Contemporary Art will be right up your alley!Exhibits are changing constantly and are often inspired by a theme or concept put forward by the gallery. It’s all very ‘subculturish’ and an intriguing part of the Tel Aviv art gallery landscape. Even better, the CCA also offers weekly workshops for children aged 6 and up so it’s a great place to teach young kids about modern art.9. Sommer Contemporary Art Gallery/Hanina GalleryThe Sommer Contemporary Art Gallery, founded in 1999, recently moved from the historic Rothschild Boulevard to an emerging ‘artists' neighborhood’ in south Tel Aviv named Kiryat HaMelacha, and if you’re curious about cooperative art spaces where old and new Tel Aviv artists come together, this is a place to head.Housed in a building that was once a Judaica factory, Sommer’s exhibitions feature a mix of prominent local artists, up-and-coming talent, and international artists who have a great reputation.An exhibition by Gregor Hildebrandt in the Sommer Contemporary Art Gallery (Picture by Avi Amsalem, taken from the officialSommer Contemporary Art Gallerywebsite)Nearby is the Hanina Gallery, a collaborative space run by 16 individuals that is not-for-profit and promotes diversity and dialogue in its exhibitions.The entire area boasts a diverse scene - it’s full of studios and artisans and today more than 32 galleries are operating in the area.10. Design Museum HolonJust a twenty-minute journey from Tel Aviv, the Design Museum in Holon is a spot no modern architecture lover should miss. Dreamed up by Ron Arad (who was inspired by Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim classic), the building is created out of Corten steel - six huge bands of metal, almost like ribbons, in dramatic reds and oranges.The Holon Design Museum (Image source: The official Holon Design Museum website)The permanent collection houses many artifacts, including textiles, lights, furniture, and limited-edition objects. Enjoy four distinct areas - older Israeli designs (from the 1930s until 2000), contemporary design (from 2000 to the present), works by up-and-coming students of design within Israel, and an international contemporary design section.The museum itself is small, but is a good place to spend an hour or so, enjoying the constantly changing exhibits and workshops. The fact that it encourages young designers and students to use the building as a creative resource is even better - and what better place to think outside the box in a space this unusual?If you’re planning on traveling outside of Tel Aviv to other popular Israeli spots, we recommend considering professional guidance: Dead Sea tours, Masada tours and guided trips in Jerusalem will enrich your experience considerably.For more about our travel company, feel free to contact us by email or phone, and to read about life in Israel, take a look at our blog.
By Sarah Mann
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