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The Complete 2-Week Israel Itinerary

You’ve decided to visit Israel, that’s great! Now you need to plan your itinerary and the Israel tours you want to take. To cover all of Israel’s stunning sites from north to south you literally need to live here, but no panic, we have prepared a two-week Israel itinerary for you to enjoy the musts. The Holy Land is steeped with ancient history. There is a biblical landmark at every turn, and delicious Mediterranean food to tempt your taste buds in every city. This small yet vibrant country will surprise you with a holistic traveling experience.These are our recommendations for the Israel gems to visit and the top activities Israel has to offer.The Wailing Wall. Photo credit: © ShutterstockDay 1: Welcome to IsraelAfter landing in Israel, spend your first day settling in and exploring Tel Aviv. Use this free day to see a local show, take a walk in Yarkon Park, or relax on Tel Aviv’s stunning beaches that stretch for 14km. Tel Aviv has excellent markets and some world-class museums. Indulge in a delicious meal at one of Tel Aviv’s top chef restaurants or discover the local street food. On your first day in Israel, you could take a short excursion to nearby attractions, like the Ramat Gan Zoo, or the marina in Herzliya. At the southernmost point of Tel Aviv’s coastline is the old port city of Jaffa. Here you can wander the narrow stone alleyways, discover one-off art galleries, hunt for bargains in the Jaffa flea market, or take in the sea views.Overnight: Tel AvivZodiac Signs Fountain, Jaffa. Photo credit: © Dmitry MishinDay 2: Tel AvivThere is no better way to get to know a city than on two wheels. Today, join a Tel Aviv Bike Tour for an urban adventure. Cycle through Tel Aviv’s well-known streets and see some of the hidden gems. The bike tour takes you to Tel Aviv Port, a vibrant repurposed space for recreation and entertainment. Ride your bike along Tel Aviv’s beachfront promenade, and through the scenic Yarkon Park. Your guide will point out top landmarks, cultural sites, and some of the city’s famous Bauhaus buildings. You’ll see Rabin Square where Prime Minister Yitzchak Rabin was assassinated, and ride along chic Rothschild Boulevard. After today’s bike tour, you’ll know Tel Aviv’s back alleys as well as its most famous streets and monuments.Overnight: Tel AvivOptional tours for this day:Jaffa Flea Market tour, Graffiti and Street Art TourSee allTel Aviv toursTel Aviv Beach Promenade. Photo credit:© Dmitry MishinDay 3: Highlights of Israel’s Coastal PlainToday is spent visiting some of the top tourist attractions along Israel’s Mediterranean coast. If you prefer comfort and hassle-free travel, this Caesarea, Acre, and Rosh Hanikra Guided Group Tour will be a smart choice. You will visit the ancient Roman ruins in Caesarea, and see the perfectly preserved Roman amphitheater. About 2,000 years ago, Herod the Great built an incredible port city at Caesarea. Nowadays, the Caesarea Archaeological Park holds the remains of a palace, bathhouse, hippodrome, and Roman temples. The next stop is the Old City of Acre. Walk through Acre’s traditional Middle Eastern market and see Ottoman-era structures like the exquisite Al-Jazzar Mosque. Admire the undergroundCrusader city built by the Knights Templar. Continue to the northernmost point on Israel’s Mediterranean coast. Take a cable car down into the breathtaking limestone sea caves of Rosh HaNikra, and see waves crashing against openings in the rock.Overnight: Tel AvivOptional tours for this day:Acre and the Western Galilee Private Tour,The Carmel Coast and Druze Village Private TourSee allCaesarea Tours Rosh Hanikra caves. Photo credit: ©Dmitry MishinDay 4: Highlights of the GalileeLeave Tel Aviv and travel north to the heavenly countryside of Galilee. Start your trip in Christ’s childhood hometown, Nazareth. If you join an organizedNazareth and Sea of Galilee Touryou will have a chance tovisit the magnificent Annunciation Church(the place where the Angel Gabriel told Mary of her future son) with a guide who will share its amazing history with you. In the crypt of St. Joseph’s Church, you will see the traditional site of Joseph’s carpentry and the Holy family home. Leaving Nazareth, continue toCana, where Jesus turned water into wine and the Mount of Beatitudes where Jesus gave the Sermon on the Mount. Stop to see the excavated home of Saint Peter at Capernaum. And visit nearby Tabgha, the site of the Church of the Multiplication. Drive along the shore of the Sea of Galilee past Tiberias, a major city established in 20BC. Don't forget to make a stop where the Sea of Galilee meets the Jordan River, at the well-known baptismal site of Yardenit.Overnight: Galilee Kibbutz hotelOptional tours for this day:Sea of Galilee, Cana, Magdala & Mt. of Beatitudes Tour, Mt. Tabor, Tsipori, Beit Shearim Private TourSee allGalilee and Golan Heights toursSt. Joseph's Church, Nazareth. Photo credit:©Dmitry MishinDay 5: Golan Heights from Tel AvivTravel to the Golan Heights mountain range which forms a natural border between Syria and Israel. The mountains are covered with woodlands, vineyards, farms, and quaint villages. YourGolan Heights tour takes you through picturesque scenery, past Hamat Gader hot springs, and to the Shalom Observatory. From here, you can see Tiberias on the shore of the Sea of Galilee. Make the next stop at Katzrin, a settlement known as the “Capital of the Golan.” Explore Katzrin’s ancient synagogue and excavated 3rd to 6th-century Jewish village. Visit Katzrin’s Golan Antiquities Museum and learn about the nearby Second Temple Era city of Gamla. Continue along the Golan Heights to Mount Bental. Once a Syrian outpost, this historical site still has trenches and bunkers from the 1967 Six-Day War. Throughout your tour of the Golan, you will have stunning views across Galilee.Overnight: JerusalemOptional tours for this day:Golan Heights Private Tour,Golan Heights, and Safed TourSee allGalilee and Golan One Day Group toursGolan Heights. Photo credit: © ShutterstockDay 6: Free Day in JerusalemThis is a free day to explore Jerusalem. You can visit the famous Mahane Yehuda Market, or maybe wander the lanes of Jerusalem’s Old City. If you love finding hidden gems, then visit the Montefiore Windmill, the American Colony Hotel, or the Museum on the Seam. Do some shopping in the huge Malcha Mall, the chic Mamilla Mall, or the Old City bazaar.Ein Kerem is one of Jerusalem’s most beautiful neighborhoods where stone houses drip with bougainvillea and quaint cottages have been turned into restaurants and art galleries. Ein Kerem is the traditional hometown of Saint John the Baptist, and this village within a city has several impressive churches. You might decide to use your free day to relax, or even go hiking in one of the spectacular nature reserves around Jerusalem.Overnight: JerusalemJerusalem market. Photo credit: © Dmitry MishinDay 7: Full-Day in JerusalemOn day seven of this Israel tour itinerary, we recommend seeing the highlights of Jerusalem. Start with a view of Jerusalem’s cityscape from Mount Scopus. Next, enter the Old City and explore the top attractions (better with a guided Jerusalem tour) including the excavated ancient Roman Cardo, and the Western Wall. The wall (or Kotel) was once part of the Jewish Temple that stood on Temple Mount and is the most sacred Jewish site in the world. In the Christian Quarter, follow the iconic Via Dolorosa, as Jesus did when he walked towards Golgotha. The Via Dolorosa ends at the Holy Sepulcher Church, which is always a highlight for Christian travelers. This breathtaking 4th-century structure encompasses the final Stations of the Cross, including the site of Christ’s crucifixion, and His burial tomb. Leaving the Old City, the tour takes you for a drive through modern-day Jerusalem past important landmarks. The final stop on today’s tour is at the Yad Vashem Holocaust Museum.Overnight: JerusalemOptional toursfor this day:In the Footsteps of Jesus Tour,Jerusalem Temple Mount & Dome of the Rock TourSee allJerusalem toursVia Dolorosa. Photo credit: © ShutterstockDay 8: Visit the West BankVisit Bethlehem and Jericho from Jerusalem - better with a West Bank Tourthat will take you through the Judean Hills and past the Inn of the Good Samaritan. On route, you’ll see the Monastery of Saint George clinging to the cliffs of Wadi Kelt. Visit the biblical city of Jericho, built in c.8,000BC. According to the Book of Joshua, the Israelites made the walls of Jericho fall by marching around the city for seven days. The tour stops at the famous sycamore tree climbed by Zacchaeus who was trying to get a better view of Jesus (Luke 19:1-10). Leaving Jericho, continue to Bethlehem where the first stop is at Manger Square. Here you can enter the 4th-century Church of the Nativity and see the Holy Grotto where Christ was born. For Christian tourists, this is usually the most emotional part of the trip. Also visit the Church of Saint Catherine, where the annual Christmas Eve Mass is held. The return journey to Jerusalem takes you past Shepherds’ Field, where the shepherds received the news of Christ’s birth on the first Christmas Eve.Overnight: JerusalemOptional toursfor this day:Bethlehem Half Day Tour,Jericho, Dead Sea, and the Jordan River TourSee all West Bank toursNativity Church, Bethlehem. Photo credit: © ShutterstockDay 9: Masada and the Dead Sea from JerusalemOn day nine, head to one of the most popular destinations in Israel - to southern Israel. The first stop is at Masada, a flat-topped mountain, where King Herod built a fortress over 2,000 years ago. You can ride the cable car to the summit and tour the remains of Herod’s fortress. If you choose to join a Masada guided tour,your guide will tell you the moving story of Jewish rebels who made the last stand against the Romans in the 70AD Jewish-Roman War. The archaeological remains on Masada are incredible, and the views overlooking the Dead Sea are unforgettable. The second half of the day is spent at the Dead Sea; a bucket list item for most tourists. This unique body of water is nine times saltier than the ocean and packed with minerals. You’ll get time to relax on the beach, float in the water, and smother your skin with Dead Sea mud for a natural facial.Overnight: Ein BokekOptional toursfor this day:Full-Day Masada Private Tour,The Dead Sea Relaxation TourSee allMasada and Dead Sea Day ToursThe Dead Sea. Photo credit: © ShutterstockDay 10: Free Day on the Shore of the Dead Sea (Ein Bokek)One day isn’t enough to indulge in the delights of the Dead Sea. So, use this leisure day to spend more time lazing on the beach, getting a beauty treatment at one of the Dead Sea spas, or exploring the surrounding area. Nearby is the Ein Gedi desert oasis with lush vegetation, idyllic streams, and waterfalls. Other attractions in the Dead Sea region include Qumran where the Dead Sea scrolls were discovered and the salt caves of Sodom.Overnight: Ein BokekThe Dead Sea Spa. Photo credit: © ShutterstockDay 11: Free Day in EilatToday we recommend you to leave the Dead Sea and travel further south to Israel’s most popular beach city, Eilat. If you ask any Israeli where they’d like to spend their vacation the answer will be Eilat. This seaside resort on the shore of the Red Sea offers all the indulgent pleasures you’d expect from a top resort destination. Try watersports, dive among the coral reefs, or even swim with dolphins. Eilat is a tax-free city, so everything is cheaper! There are several excellent malls, including the Ice Mall, which has an ice rink in the center. A free day means time on the Coral beach, shopping, and maybe a camel ride. End the day with a sunset cruise, and a sumptuous fish dinner. Eilat is also known for its beach bars, laid-back atmosphere, and dynamic nightlife.Overnight: EilatEilat. Photo credit: © ShutterstockDay 12: Petra from EilatAs part of this complete Israel tour itinerary, you also need to see Jordan’s top attraction - the ancient city of Petra, probably, better with an organized 1-day tour to Petra.Start day twelve early with a drive across the Arava border to the Kingdom of Jordan. Thousands of years ago the Nabataean people created Petra as a desert oasis that became a prosperous stop along the ancient Arabian trade routes. The buildings, ornately decorated temples, and tombs of Petra were carved out of red rock cliffs. Take a walk along Petra’s colonnaded main street, and be amazed by the rock facades that tower above you. On the return journey to Eilat, you’ll travel through Wadi Rum, a desert wilderness made famous by Lawrence of Arabia. There may be time for a brief panoramic tour of Jordan’s Red Sea city, Aqaba before returning to Eilat.Overnight: EilatOptional tours for this day:Petra One Day Tour from Eilat, Petra & Wadi Rum, 2 Days from EilatSee all Petra tours from EilatPetra. Photo credit: © ShutterstockDay 13: Timna, Mitzpe RamonToday leave Eilat and travel north through the heart of southern Arava, to Timna Park. Historical archaeological sites and unique geological features cover Timna’s unique landscape. The park is best known for its strange natural rock formations created millions of years ago by tectonic activity when the Great Rift Valley was formed. Timna is home to the world’s earliest copper mines which were used over 6,000 years ago by the ancient Egyptians. At the heart of the park is Timna Lake where there are tourist facilities and activities. After an exhilarating day, the tour continues north to Tel Aviv passed Mitzpe Ramon, a town perched on the edge of the incredible Ramon Crater.The 40km-long crater was formed by natural erosion, over 220 million years ago. Standing on the rim of the crater and looking out across the Negev Desert is a once-in-a-lifetime experience.Overnight:Tel AvivMountain goat in Mitzpe Ramon. Photo credit: © Jenny EhrlichDay 14: Tel-Aviv-Your Last Day in Israel, Free Day and DepartureWhat an experience! On your last day in Israel, you can relax in your Tel Aviv hotel and reflect on the Israeli tours that have taken you from one end of the country to the other. Pack your bags at your leisure, and prepare to head off to Ben Gurion airport. Depending on the time of your flight, you might want to buy last-minute souvenirs or gifts for the family. Use this day to visit any places you still want to see, enjoy the Tel Aviv beaches, explore the Tel Aviv Museum of Art, or tour the Carmel market. Then, it's time to head off to Ben Gurion Airport and begin your journey home.Carmel Market. Photo credit:© Dmitry MishinIf you wish to cover the majority of these sites in Israel, go ahead and book aclassical 10-day Israel tour. If you are interested in visiting Jordan as well, check thisIsrael and Jordan Tour Package, 12 Days.You can see the country’s top attractions without having to worry about transportation, open hours, or hotel bookings. You’ll have a mix of free days to explore, and tour days with a knowledgeable guide to show you the sites. With this itinerary, you can see the entire country.
By Petal Mashraki
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48 Hours in Tel Aviv - How to Get the Most of 2 Days in Tel Aviv

Well, it’s official - Tel Aviv has just been named by Forbes as the second-best city in the world to visit in 2020 (disclosure: the White City was only beaten by Sin City...aka Las Vegas). And for anyone who’s visited here, this decision will come as no surprise. With its miles of pristine, sandy beaches, eclectic foodie scenes, and diverse neighborhoods (historic and hipster) you’re spoilt for choice with ways to enjoy yourself. Here’s our guide to 48 action-packed hours in Tel Aviv, a taste of a city that we guarantee will leave you longing for more.Day 1A) Namal PortThe majority of Tel Aviv tours start at the Namal Port. Originally built in the 1930s and used to store Israel’s most successful export - Jaffa Oranges - the hangers are still in evidence. Today, however, it’s more of a commercial hub, with a wonderful boardwalk, plenty of fashionable stores and restaurants, and a Friday Farmer’s Market that sells high-end local produce. After you’ve wandered the area, grab a coffee or ‘limonada’ (Israelis take theirs with mint) and begin strolling south, along the promenade (‘Tayelet’) along the endless Tel Aviv beaches. Each has its own unique flavor (some are popular with surfers or dancers, others with dog-lovers of the gay community) but all have fine white sand, clear water, benches to sit and take in the view, and even free workout stations (incredibly popular with the locals, who love to stay in shape). You could also join a Tel Aviv bike tourand experience the city’s vibrant atmosphere, top landmarks, and fantastic weather riding along the beachfront promenade andthrough Park HaYarkon, along the banks of the Yarkon River where there are expansive green lawns, lush gardens, and shady trees.Or discover the mouth-watering blend of spices that go into traditional Tel Aviv street snacks like sabich on a classicalTel Aviv street food tour.B) Yemenite Quarter and the Carmel MarketAfter around 45 minutes, you’ll hit the Yemenite Quarter, a maze of alleyways, part-renovated, part-dilapidated, but full of charm. Wander the narrow streets, then tour the Carmel Market, orShuk haCarmel, Tel Aviv’s most lively and colorful bazaar which is a hive of activity before the Jewish Shabbat begins on Friday night. Take in the Levantine smells, purchase some local spices to take home, then grab lunch at Shlomo and Doron (a grandfather and grandson team) renowned for their affordable hummus, and delicious vegan toppings. Afterward, sit with the locals at Beer Bazaar, one of the market’s most popular hangouts, which stocks over 100 different craft beers from around the country. It’s always lively, with occasional musical performances as the day wears on. Walk five minutes down to the beach and watch the sun go down over the Mediterranean.C) Rothschild BoulevardAfter a quick nap, take an early evening stroll along Rothschild Boulevard, one of Tel Aviv’s most iconic streets, crammed full of Bauhaus buildings, a style that originated in 1930s Germany and which gave Tel Aviv the name of ‘White City’. To see the stunning Tel Aviv murals, join a Tel Aviv street art tour.There’s no shortage of good restaurants in the neighborhood - we’d recommend Cafe Noir, a long-established European-style bistro, with seating areas that cater both to romantic dates and those inclined to a more buzzy atmosphere. It’s rumored that they serve the best chicken schnitzel in town, but don’t take our word for it!Stroll home leisurely whilst watching Tel Aviv’s young crowd head out for fun - the city has one of the most enviable nightlife scenes in the world and it’s rumored that things rarely get started before 2 am!Day 2A) JaffaBegin your day in the ancient port of Jaffa, with a history that stretches ack 4,000 years. Wander the narrow streets (named after zodiac signs) and pop into some of the many art galleries in the neighborhood. Walk through the Abrasha Park (with its stunning views) - this area is home to St Peter’s Church (with its Spanish baroque style), the ‘Gate of Faith’ statue (made of marble from the Galilee), and the ‘Smiling Whale’ sculpture.A short stroll away is the Jaffa Flea Market and whilst the second-hand section is closed on Shabbat, there are plenty of stores, cafes, and restaurants to enjoy.For lunch, we’d recommend the quirky Pua, which has been around forever but retains a special charm. The food is fresh and simple but moderately priced and beautifully served, and the portions are enormous. Moreover, it offers plenty of vegetarian and vegan options (including pumpkin dumplings, red tahini, and fried cauliflower). Don’t hesitate to order a jug of their lemonade to go with your meal. (Fun fact: every piece of furniture in the restaurant is for sale). Another option is to join a guided Jaffa Flea Market tour "From Shuk to Chic" so that a local guide couldtake you through the labyrinth of lanes where junk, carpets, antiques and restored furniture spill out onto the sidewalk.B) Neve TsedekFrom Jaffa, take a leisurely stroll along the beachfront to Neve Tsedek, one of Tel Aviv’s oldest and most picturesque neighborhoods. Wander down Shabazi Street (the main thoroughfare), peruse the boutiques and jewelry stores then pop into the Anita gelateria for a sweet treat, or enjoy a coffee at Suzanna, a long-standing local haunt with a lovely garden in which to sit. Neve Tsedek is also packed full of cultural treasures including the Suzanne Dellal Centre (a cultural center, which is home to Israeli dance) and the Rubin Museum (who painted in a style similar to that of Matisse and was occasionally referred to as the ‘Gaugin of Palestine!’)C) Dizengoff StreetSpend your evening on Dizengoff Street which, like Rothschild Boulevard, has to be experienced. Named after the city’s first mayor, it has a bit of everything - fine-dining, casual coffee shops, glamorous cocktail bars and it’s the newly-renovated central square, complete with fountain, chairs, and trees that provide shade in the scorching summer months. Enjoy a ‘Happy Hour’ cocktail at Spicehaus (a ‘concept’ bar where the staff dress as pharmacists and the skeleton at the door reminds of your old school biology lab). Drinks are served, appropriately, in potion bottles of three sizes - and we recommend the Istanbul-Louisville Express (with gin, lychee, aloe vera, and rose flavoring). Then, a stone’s throw from the bar, have dinner at La Shuk, serving elegant, Mediterranean food (think fresh seafood, kebabs, and a medley of vegetable dishes). This is a hot spot (with a patio that’s perfect for people-watching) so be sure to make a reservation in advance.Dizengoff is always lively on a Saturday night, and so if you’ve any remaining energy, there’s always going to be a bar or coffee shop to wile away your last hour or two.
By Sarah Mann
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Israel Cruise Excursions - All You Need to Know

Tourists arriving in Israel’s port cities of Haifa or Ashdod can take a short ship-to-shore excursion to many of the top attractions. Israel is a small country and most of the important destinations are close enough to Haifa or Ashdod to be included in a day tour. Israel cruise excursions include pick-up from the port, a fully-guided day of sightseeing and drop-off at your cruise ship in time for your cruise departure. Most shore excursions are private tours which means there is a recommended suggested itinerary but you can alter it to your liking. If there are places you are more interested in you can stay longer and if there are places you would rather not visit you can swap them for places that interest you more. The cruise excursions include air-conditioned transportation and the tour price is determined by the distance covered; guide language; length of tour (usually 10 hours); size of vehicle and the day of the week.Israel Cruise Excursion Options from Haifa PortCruise Excursion to Nazareth and the GalileeAlthough Ashdod is a little too far south to get all the way to the north and back in time for your cruise departure Haifa is well located for a day trip to the north. From Haifa port this ship-to-shore excursion travels north to one of the most beautiful areas of the country. The Galilee has rolling hills with a patchwork of farmlands; forests; olive groves; vineyards and small villages and towns. Stop in Nazareth to tour the Church of Ascension and the Church of Saint Joseph built above grottos that may have been the Holy Family’s home and Joseph’s carpentry workshop. Then continue to Tiberias on the edge of the Sea of Galilee and visit Biblical landmarks around the lake like Capernaum and the Mount of Beatitudes.Haifa Port Cruise Excursion to Haifa and AcreSeeing as you are docking in Haifa why not do some sightseeing here. Visit the magnificent Baha’i Gardens planted on 18 terraces that cascade down Mount Carmel. You can also learn about the unique Baha’i religion. At the foot of Mount Carmel see the restored German Templar Quarter. As you travel north stop in Acre, an ancient city built of stone. Descend beneath the Old City of Acre to an underground Crusader city and learn about the many conquerors that have passed through Acre leaving their mark. Your guide will take you on a walk through the bazaar and show you the Turkish baths and Turkish Citadel used years later by the British to hold Jewish prisoners. If you have time travel to the northernmost point of Israel’s coast and walk through the pristine sea caves of Rosh HaNikra.Israel Cruise Excursion Options from Ashdod Port or Haifa PortJerusalem and Dead Sea/BethlehemTake a tour of the Holy Land’s top destination – Jerusalem. Get an overview of Jerusalem from the Mount of Olives where there are many churches marking Biblical sites and at the foot of the mount is the Church of All Nations and the Garden of Gethsemane. Take a walk through the Old City where you can visit the Western Wall; the Old City bazaar; ancient synagogues; walk the Via Dolorosa and spend time in the stunning Church of the Holy Sepulchre. As this is a private tour you can pick and choose the sites in the Old City that interest you. Perhaps even include a visit to Mount Zion to see King David’s Tomb and the Room of the Last Supper. You could also visit the Yad VaShem Holocaust Museum or the archaeological site of the City of David established 3,000 years ago. As an option, you could spend half your day in Jerusalem and the other half visiting Bethlehem to see where Jesus was born or the Dead Sea, a natural wonder at the lowest point on Earth where the water is ten times saltier than the ocean.Masada and Dead Sea Ship-to-Shore ExcursionTravel from your cruise ship south to Masada, a massive “mesa” a flat-topped mount with steep rocky sides. Masada rises out of the flat desert landscape and served King Herod who wanted a safe retreat. Visitors can take a cable car to Masada’s summit and tour the remains of Herod’s large fortress-palace complex which includes storerooms, guardrooms, palaces, Roman baths and more. From the top of Masada, there are brilliant views across the desert all the way to the Dead Sea which is where you can spend the rest of the day. The tour takes you to one of the Dead Sea beaches where you can indulge in the sun, sea and fresh air which have been found to have therapeutic beauty and health benefits. Get a classic photo floating in the salty water where it is impossible to sink! As a private cruise excursion, you can choose how much time to spend on the beach and whether to include other stops like Qumran where the Dead Sea Scrolls were found or the desert oasis of Ein Gedi.Caesarea and Tel AvivAfter being met by your personal guide at Haifa or Ashdod port travel to Caesarea to the excavated site of a powerful Roman port city built by King Herod. Here you can walk among the remains of storehouses, temples, palaces and Roman baths. See the amphitheater that is still used to this day and the hippodrome where chariots once rode alongside the sea. Also, see the Crusader walls and structures build hundreds of years later. From the old to the new the tour takes you to Israel’s modern metropolis of Tel Aviv. See the long stretch of beach flanked by a wide promenade; discover the up-market Rothschild Boulevard; experience the hustle and bustle of Carmel Market and wander through the quaint historic neighborhood of Neve Tsedek. Other sites to include on your private tour of Tel Aviv are Dizengoff Street; Yitzchak Rabin Square and the marvelous Jaffa Port.See all our recommended Israel Shore Excursions
By Petal Mashraki
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Attractions in Tel Aviv for Hipsters

Hipsters are always looking for cool unusual things to do no matter if they are in their local neighborhood or on vacation. Even Tel Aviv has its hipster hang-outs and hipster clubs, pubs, cafes and attractions. Here are some great ideas for hipsters in Tel Aviv.Hipsters love the urban vibe, melting pot of cultures, indie music, alternative styles, non-mainstream fashion from vintage to thrift stores and organic artisan food. These gentrified bohemians will feel right at home in Tel Aviv.Tel Aviv Hipster HotelsTel Aviv is full of hipster-friendly hotels like Brown Hotel TLV where there is a hot bar scene and worn leather wing chairs in the lobby. Mendeli Street Hotel is a chic beach-side hotel popular with solo hipster travelers who enjoy the integrated local art and the boutique feel of this remodeled 70s Brutalist building.Tel Aviv’s Hipster NeighborhoodsYou’ll find yuppie hipsters hanging out in cafes in the Neve Tzedek neighborhood. This is a picturesque part of the city with many restored historic buildings. The neighborhood boasts quaint book stores, art galleries and trendy bars along Shabazi Street.Neve TzedekFlorentin is Tel Aviv’s ultimate Hipster neighborhood and it has been compared to New York City’s Brooklyn. Florentin took second place in a list of top international Hipster neighborhoods. The neighborhood even inspired a television series about the cool young residents of this area. If you ignore the more run down parts of Florentin you can enjoy the many cozy cafes, friendly bars and delicious food with local artists, students, foreign residents and up and coming entrepreneurs. Check out Taxidermy Bar with its unique décor or mellow at The Pasaz Allenby. Rothschild 12 is a good place for free live entertainment and urban-chic while Satchmo is the place to go for hip jazz. Tel Aviv has some innovative art museums and independent galleries; many are located on Gordon Street. In Holon hipsters will love the Design Museum and the Israeli Museum of Caricature and Comics. Hipsters should also check out Shenkin Street for bohemian chic, Rothschild Boulevard and the organic farmers’ market at Tel Aviv Port.Hipster Nightlife in Tel AvivFlorentin is also the neighborhood to head to when the sun goes down as the best nightclubs are here including Hoodna. Radio EPGB is a bar for trendsetters but it is not easy to find and so maintains some of its exclusive feel. You’ll hear great music like the Beatles, Don McLean and Radiohead and on Sundays there is a drag show. HaMinzar at Allenby 60 is one of the cool hipster bar/restaurants in Tel Aviv. It is an unassuming space but the food is delicious and the people fascinating.Tel Aviv is literally hipster heaven. Everywhere you look there is some cool individual trying something new or reinventing what already exists in the most hip and indie way.
By Petal Mashraki
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Top 15 Free Things to Do in Tel Aviv

Even if you are in Tel Aviv on a tight budget you can still see the sites and have a great time. Here’s a rundown of the top 15 free things to do in the beautiful city of Tel Aviv.View of Tel Aviv beachfront from Jaffa.Photo credit: © Dmitry Mishin1. Tel Aviv BeachesTel Aviv has some magnificent beaches which run continuously from Tzuk Beach in the north to Alma Beach in the south. Each beach has its own character like the Separated Beach which has separate hours for male and female bathers; Atzmaut Beach which is popular with the gay community and Drummers Beach or Dolphinarium Beach where musicians jam each Friday at sundown. Beach season in Tel Aviv is April to October when lifeguards are on duty.androm2. Tel Aviv MarketsAmong Tel Aviv’s top markets there is the Carmel Market a lively outdoor market where fresh produce and other goods are sold. This market is colorful and exciting, not only that but it is in the heart of the city just off Allenby Street. Adjacent to Carmel Market is Nahalat Binyanim Street Market. This pedestrian walkway hosts an arts and crafts market on Tuesdays and Fridays.There are often street performers at the market. Nahalat Binyamin is lined with great coffee shops where you can sit and enjoy the atmosphere. Levinsky Market is the least gentrified of the three markets. Here you’ll find streets veering off of Levinsky Street from the corner of HaAliya Street to HaMashbir Street. The streets are crowded with small hole-in-the-wall stalls selling fresh produce and everything including the kitchen sink.Orange juice seller, Carmel Market, Tel Aviv.Photo credit: © Dmitry Mishin3. Free Walking ToursTel Aviv municipality offers free walking tours in English on Saturdays at 11 am which meet at 46 Rothschild Boulevard. The tours take a look at the amazing Bauhaus architecture of the White City and introduce participants to a little of the history of Tel Aviv. There is also a tour of Old Jaffa which takes you through the Jaffa flea market and the Old City examining some of Jaffa’s archeological sites and ending up in the Hapisga Garden. This tour meets on Wednesdays at 9:30 am at the Jaffa clock tower. You can also pick up a free map of self-guided walking tours from City Hall. On Mondays at 11 am there is a free tour of Tel Aviv University which gives an introduction to some of the campus’ innovative architecture and environmental sculptures. The university tour meets at the Dyonon bookstore at the campus entrance by the intersection of Haim Levanon and Einstein Streets.4. Self-Guided Tour of Neve TzedekYou don’t need a professional tour guide to explore one of Tel Aviv’s oldest and perhaps most picturesque neighborhoods – Neve Tzedek. This neighborhood was the first Jewish neighborhood established outside of the ancient Port of Jaffa in 1887. Many of the beautiful historic buildings have been restored and now house boutique stores, quaint cafes, and restaurants giving it a small village within a city feel. The neighborhood has some notable Bauhaus and Art Nouveau buildings. A few museums like the Nachum Gutman Museum; art galleries and the Suzanne Dellal Center for Dance are all in this neighborhood. At the southern end of Neve Tzedek is HaTachana, a restored historic train station that has been converted into a shopping and entertainment compound.The lighthouse path, Tel Aviv. Photo by Mor Shani on Unsplash5. Tel Aviv Port The old Tel Aviv Port has been given a make-over and has become a primary entertainment and retail hub for locals and visitors. The port has an expansive boardwalk covering 14,000m² and is lined with interesting restaurants, playgrounds, a carousel, an organic produce market, and fashion stores. When the sun goes down the port becomes the city’s hot nightlife spot. The port is often the site of special events and street performers.6. Ben Gurion HouseThis is one of the city’s smallest museums and is often overlooked by visitors. Ben Gurion House is the former residence of Israel’s first Prime Minister, David Ben Gurion at 17 Ben Gurion Boulevard. Visitors to the museum can walk through the Ben Gurion library; see the living quarters and the study where the prime minister worked. There is a free guided tour of the house where you can learn about the house’s history and the life of Ben Gurion.7. SaronaSarona is a former German Templer colony established in 1817 in what is now one of Tel Aviv’s busiest neighborhoods near the Azrieli towers. The Templers were a German Protestant sect which aimed to realize the apocalyptic vision of the prophets in the Holy Land. They established Sarona as an agricultural settlement and at its peak, there were 41 homes, a winery, workshops, a communal hall, and barns. In 1941 the British deported the residents of Sarona who were believed to be Nazi supporters. Today this compound of buildings has been restored and turned into a shopping and entertainment complex. The former Templer homes are now house restaurants, cafes, and boutique stores. The open spaces between the houses are beautiful plazas where you can relax and enjoy people watching special events and street performers.Tel Aviv Promenade (Tayelet). Photo by Shai Pal on Unsplash8. Yarkon ParkAt the northern end of Tel Aviv is this urban oasis; an expansive green Yarkon park with the Yarkon River meandering through the lawns towards the sea. The park is home to many attractions including climbing walls, paddle boat rental, playgrounds, basketball courts, bicycle rental, and if you continue north you can even reach the safari park in Ramat Gan. So even if you are looking for free things to do in Tel Aviv you can relax on the lawns and enjoy the pleasant surroundings and river views.9. Old JaffaAt the southern end of Tel Aviv along the coast is the old port city of Jaffa which is associated with the biblical story of Jonah, Saint Peter, and mythical tales of Andromeda and Perseus. As far back as the Middle Ages, the port was a gateway to the Holy Land, and many travelers, armies, and merchants landed here including Napoleon. Today you can wander along the narrow cobbled lanes between stone buildings leading down to the water and the old port. There are many art galleries, cafes, and restaurants as well as historic sites and museums in Jaffa. Among the sites to see, there is the Libyan Synagogue, St. Peter’s Church, the Zodiac Fountain, the home of Simon the Tanner, the Mahmudiyah Mosque, the Wishing Bridge, Andromeda’s Rock, the Sea Mosque, and the Ilana Goor Museum.10. Tel Aviv RollersDon’t be surprised if you are taking a stroll through Tel Aviv on a regular Tuesday night when a huge group of people on rollerblades whiz by. Each Tuesday skaters meet at Habima Square at 10 pm and the group begins rolling through the city. They roll through the city showing off their skating skills and having fun. Everyone is welcome to join in so get your skates on!Children at Tel Aviv Old Port. Photo credit: © Dmitry Mishin11. Tel Aviv University Botanical GardensExplore the 34,000m² of the university botanical gardens where there are rare and endangered species of plants from around the globe. There are 3800 plant species from Israel and around the world growing in the campus botanical gardens. The gardens are arranged in ecological groups and themed gardens. Sections in the gardens include the ecological garden of Israeli plants and Mediterranean woodlands; tropical plants from the rainforests; plants utilized by humans; medicinal plants; cacti; poisonous plants; a Palm House; succulent plants and root trees in the Sarah Racine Root Laboratory. The gardens are used by university students for research in ecological and botanical studies and visitors are welcomed for free.12. Rabin SquareIn modern Tel Aviv history, this is one of the most significant sites of the city. Back in 1995, this public square that faces the Tel Aviv Municipality building was called Kings of Israel Square. The tragic events of November 4th, 1995 led to the renaming of the square in honor of Yitzhak Rabin, former Israeli political icon and Prime Minister. It was here on that fateful night during a peace rally that Rabin was assassinated while returning to his car. You can see the exact spot where the assassination took place and the memorial which now marks this location in the northeastern corner of the square. There is also a section of wall covered in graffiti which was drawn by mourners who came to pay their respects in the days following the assassination. In addition, there is a memorial sculpture commemorating the Holocaust at the south end of the square, pleasant trees, and an ecological pool in the square. Rabin Square is often used for concerts, special events, and rallies.Rokach House, Neve Tzedek, Tel Aviv.Photo credit: © Dmitry Mishin13. The Photo HouseAt 5 Tchernichovsky Street is a store/ archive of historic photographs documenting the early days of Israel. The collection includes posters, postcards, and photographs. The store is legendary; it is still run by the Weissenstein family which established the shop in 1936. It is the city’s oldest photoshop and it is more like a museum than a store. In addition to the displayed photos which are on sale, there are regular exhibitions. The private archive of photographs has won several awards and has been exhibited across the globe. All of the photos in the archives were taken by Rudi Weissenstein and all of the prints and souvenirs featuring photographs are taken from the negatives of Weissenstein’s collection. Weissenstein photographed the first performance of the Palestine Symphony Orchestra in 1936; Weissenstein was the only official photographer to document the signing of the Declaration of Independence of the State of Israel in 1948; Weissenstein’s image was featured on an Israeli banknote in 1958 and he won first prize at the International Photography Exhibition in Moscow in 1961.Tel Aviv and Jaffa aerial view. Photo by Shai Pal on Unsplash14. Tel Aviv Art GalleriesTel Aviv has many independent art galleries but there is a particular concentration of galleries along Ben Yehuda Street and Gordon Street which intersects Ben Yehuda Street. You can wander along these pleasant Tel Aviv streets popping into each of the galleries to see current local and sometimes international art. Start with Gerstein Gallery at #101 Ben Yehuda Street and work your way towards Gordon Street. Along the way you will see JOJO Gallery with unique utilitarian and decorative art; Engel Gallery; Gordon Gallery and then on Gordon Street there is the Stern Gallery and Givon Gallery. Along the way and in the adjacent side streets you will discover other fascinating galleries. If you continue on Ben Yehuda Street you will reach Frishman Street where there are even more galleries.15. Musical FountainTel Aviv has a spectacular sound and light musical fountain show to rival those in Barcelona and Las Vegas. The modern music is synchronized to dancing lights illuminating fountains squirting up into the air. This spectacle takes place at Tel Aviv Port during the summer (July and August). There are nightly performances Sunday to Thursday with the fountains at 6:30 pm, 7:15 pm, and 7:45 pm and the sound and lights joining in for performances at 8:15 pm, 8:45 pm, 9:15 pm, 9:45 pm, and 10:15 pm.If you are interested in Tel Aviv tours and attractions, feel free to check out this article.Hamsas sold at Carmel Market, Tel Aviv. Photo by Bartosz Kwitkowski on Unsplash
By Petal Mashraki
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